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Dr. Helen

September 23rd, 2013 - 5:17 am

Jonathan Taylor: A Voice for Male Students (guest posting at College Insurrection):

Those who study the data on boys in education know that male educational underachievement is not a new phenomenon. The only thing that is new is the willingness of a principled few to talk about it. This then begs the question: why have these issues been ignored for so long, especially when we are decades deep into an academic culture that prides itself on closing the gaps?

The reality, as many of you likely know, is that much of the culture of academia has been perverted far from values like equity, diversity, and so forth – values it claims to promote, but no longer believes in. Instead, many of them now live in a world where equality means discrimination, gender sensitivity means vindictiveness and class hatred, and tolerance of diversity means celebrating and protecting only the speech of those who hold similar perspectives.

In the context of sex, this most often manifests itself in the form of misandry, prejudice and hatred toward men and boys as a group (see here for a thorough introduction to this phenomenon). Men’s advocates like myself find that this phenomenon is both permissive and pervasive in the culture of our educational institutions, especially in certain humanities and administrative departments, and most often manifests itself in the idea that men and boys as a group deserve some kind of “payback” for how one-sided the world supposedly once was and still is.

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Taylor is now on my daily read list, an awesome resource site and well written entries.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
When I was a graduate teaching assistant, I taught two freshman classes a semester. In one class, there was this young man (I won't call him a boy) that caught my attention. He was a tall kid, a bright kid. He needed to work on composition skills, as all freshmen do (including girls), so in order to motivate him I gave him a copy of a book to read, A Book of Five Rings, by Myamato Musashi, the greatest samurai warrior ever.

This guy, Musashi, survived four wars, which is no easy feat. Imagine thousands of men on a field with swords slicing each other apart. Then Musashi became a ronin, which is a lordless samurai, and embarked on a mission to find the way of the sword. He travelled around Japan and challenged the best sumarai he could find to a duel. Here's the thing, he only used a wooden sword (once he used an oar) in these duels. Think about that, a wooden sword against a steel sword, talk about a disadvantage. Yeah, well Musashi won 65 duels to the death, against the best competition. Then, after having vanquished all his opponents, he climbed a mountain and lived in a cave, where he wrote A Book of Five Rings.

It's a book of strategy. They actually teach it at the Harvard School of Business, or used to anyway.

I don't know why this young man caught my attention, maybe because he was alert, attentive, followed instructions, and corrected his mistakes. So I gave him a copy of a book, and what did he do with it?

He wrote a paper comparing Musashi's technique with a sword to Michael Jordan's technique with a basketball. Wow. He had been a basketball player in high school. Did I give him that assignment? No. I just gave him a book to read. He read it, and came up that topic all on his own. Comparing Musashi to Jordan? I never would have even thought of that, but he did. In fact, he blew off the assigned topic, which was some stupid topic that the curriculum required, and went off on his own. I admire that. This young man absorbed what was useful and applied it to what interests him, I gave him an A, or actually he earned an A, for what was the most interesting paper I read over two years, four semesters.

This is the point. If you give young men something to read that motivates them, they will respond to it and come up with something you never dreamed of.

The problem with the education system is this. At the elementary level, almost all of the teachers are women. At the middle school and even the high school level, the same is true. At the college level, almost all of the professors are men.

If anyone is to blame for the corruption of the curriculum today, it's them. They are sychophants to the feminist cause. They don't care about the after-effects; they have lifetime tenure. And so they denigrate boys and young men, in some desperate pursuit of the feminist ideal, and their curriculum reflects that fact.

The sad thing is that most of these professors will retire, and who will replace them in their positions of power? Not men. No, it will be women who have been indoctrinated, and then it's only going to get worse.

We have a real problem with education in this country. We have a real problem with culture in this country. The more we denigrate young men and promote young women, regardless of their skiils, the more we deteriorate as a society. And all of us will suffer for it.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
It's because of GawainsGhost wrote above that I'm getting interested in the possibilities of Internet-based higher (and even lower!) education. Cut the entire entrenched hierarchy out of the loop. Offer practical and philosophical education without the blatant indoctrination courses, and let the students choose what they want to take and what course of study they want to pursue. I would be willing to do some work developing course material for such an institution.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Many colleges are now recognizing that there is a significant achievement gap between males and females on campus. But since any attempts to narrow the achievement gap would be automatically labeled as "sexist" by the politically correct feminist community, most squishy college administrators won't touch it with a proverbial ten-foot pole.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
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