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TSA ‘Abusively and Arbitrarily’ Using Security Designation to Hide Information

“Limits on such labeling of information are needed to provide greater transparency and accountability," report finds.

by
Bill Straub

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June 7, 2014 - 12:01 am
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WASHINGTON – The Transportation Security Administration has been misusing its power to withhold certain sensitive documents from view under the guise of maintaining safety, according to a congressional report, while actually endeavoring to keep potentially disconcerting information from the public eye.

The House Oversight & Government Reform Committee, in an unusual bipartisan finding, determined that the TSA has “abusively and arbitrarily” used a designation known as Sensitive Security Information (SSI) to “hide information from Congress and the public about some ugly realities,” said Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), the committee chairman.

Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Government Operations, which held a hearing on the issue last week, asserted that the report “confirms that TSA gamed the system to use security classifications to keep Congress and the public from having access to key information in order to protect their turf.”

“TSA must end its arbitrary use of Sensitive Security Information and ensure that security and accountability to the public are its primary concerns,” he said.

The issue was raised in July 2011, when Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) disclosed information obtained at a congressional hearing regarding airport incidents involving security breaches. Chaffetz soon thereafter received a letter from Joseph Maher, deputy general counsel for the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees TSA, accusing him of unlawfully releasing the non-classified information obtained at the hearing because it was designated SSI.

Issa, acting on Chaffetz’s behalf, informed DHS that members of Congress are constitutionally protected if they disclose either SSI or classified information. The probe was launched after it was determined that the information cited by Chaffetz was improperly designated as SSI in the first place.

According to the new report, the Federal Aviation Administration in 1974 created a category for sensitive but unclassified information popularly known as “Sensitive Security Information” and issued regulations prohibiting the disclosure of information designated as such as detrimental to transportation security. Under the regulation, documents designated as SSI were exempted from release under the Freedom of Information Act.

In wake of the bombing of a commercial airliner that crashed in Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, the FAA broadened the regulation to include, among other things, any information the FAA administrator determined could reveal systemic vulnerabilities within the aviation system. It was later expanded further to limit access to protected information to those persons who have a “need-to-know.”

A committee investigation revealed “possible misuse of the SSI designation by TSA,” according to the report. “Witnesses detailed instances in which TSA barred the release of SSI documents against the advice of TSA’s SSI Office. TSA also released SSI documents against the advice of career staff in the SSI office.”

The probe found that many of the problems related to the SSI designation process emerge from the structure of the regulation itself. The final authority on SSI designation rests with the TSA administrator, who is required to provide documentation supporting the SSI designation. But the committee found evidence of designations made without the administrator offering the written documentation supporting the action.

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All Comments   (3)
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Security classifications are applied for two basic reasons: to protect information that would give an enemy an advantage, and to protect politicians and bureaucrats from being embarrassed.
24 weeks ago
24 weeks ago Link To Comment
90% of all items in all security systems since the world began are unjustified, and probably 20% of all items in all security system since the world began, cover abuse rather than the purported topic.

And both these numbers are wildly optimistic.
24 weeks ago
24 weeks ago Link To Comment
Some can accuse the GOP of not being active enough. At the risk of inadvertently leaving someone out, I refer them especially to Issa, in oversight, Imhoff on climate stability, and in general the work of Cruz, Paul, Lee, and Sessions.

Apologies to the deserving missing.
24 weeks ago
24 weeks ago Link To Comment
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