The senator said he’s “absolutely confident” in the party’s midterm hopes and said they need to mind the old adage “people do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

“We are going to have to embrace people in a way they deserve to be embraced,” Scott stressed. “If we win people, elections will take care of themselves.”

He also encouraged greater communication with constituencies, noting “too often politicians want to speak for somebody before they speak to somebody.”

The “great Americans” he meets in his home state are usually struggling because of two main factors, he said: educational opportunities that fall short and skills that do not meet those required in a 21st century workforce.

Scott described folks he has met in Charleston looking for a way up. “They’re hungry and thirsty, looking for someone to present an American solution.”