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The Saudi Pedophile Chronicles

If you want to rape a 12-year-old girl and have the authorities give you a wink and a thumbs-up, Saudi Arabia is the place for you.

by
Jamie Glazov

Bio

February 19, 2010 - 12:00 am
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The Saudis really need to get an infomercial out there — and the Nation magazine and other leftist sites that apologize for Islamic gender apartheid can feature it on their webpages. It would go something like this:

A Saudi sheikh dressed slickly in Saudi garb would be sitting confidently in a chair, looking into the camera with an excited smile. He would then begin asking, with earnestness and an encouraging tone:

Are you a pedophile? Do you like underage girls? Would you like to rape one of them — or several? And get away with it? Even have it legally sanctioned? Then Saudi Arabia is for you.

The screen then shifts to a shopping mall filled with niqab-covered women (only the slit of the eyes showing) walking up and down in front of stores. It remains unclear what message this is supposed to denote, but the camera stays focused on these shrouded women for about ten seconds. Then a warning appears that all infidels who are interested must first convert to Islam. This is followed by a phone number appearing over a black background, indicating a contact person who can be reached. A voice then explains that this person lurks within the Saudi religious police and that he will connect interested parties to Saudi fathers intent on selling their underage girls into marriage — a standard practice in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi fathers, you see, they know what’s up: it’s better to sell one’s daughter at a very young age to get raped under the sanctioning of Islamic law than to risk her getting older and bringing shame to the family — which can happen in a million ways in Saudi Arabia (i.e., she might go outside without permission or attempt to run out of a burning building unveiled). This all gets too needlessly complicated — as you then have to kill her. So why go through all the trouble when you can make some cash while she’s young and get rid of the problem?

After the phone number is flashed on the screen, the infomercial ends with a little talk from Jasem Muhammad al-Mutawah, Saudi Arabia’s infamous “expert” on Islamic “family matters.” He’s holding one of his favorite rods and begins to explain and gleefully demonstrate with it how a husband should use it to beat his wife — as he has done on Saudi instructional TV programs on wife beating on Iqraa TV.

These kinds of Saudi infomercials could really capitalize on a grotesque, barbaric, and nightmarish reality within the kingdom — to which the international community responds with a deafening silence and shameless paralysis. The other day, for instance, a typical news report emerged out of Saudi Arabia: a 12-year-old girl was sold by her father into marriage with an 80-year-old man. The Saudi father sold her to his cousin, who had previously married three other young girls, for the equivalent of $22,600 U.S. currency.

After the “wedding,” the girl was taken to the hospital because of horrible physical injuries she sustained in the rape that followed the “festivities” — which involves the “wife” and all women forced into a closet and the men “celebrating” in a large room, spending most of the time staring into each other’s eyes. If an outsider was present at this function and didn’t know the “culture,” he would definitely think that a gay wedding, of one form or another, was underway. But not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Eman Al Nafjan, a Saudi blogger and women’s rights advocate, is one of the few courageous voices speaking out against this vicious injustice of child rape in Saudi Arabia. Her voice fills the void left by the shameless silence of the “progressive” left in the West, which dares not speak a word of criticism against Islam, lest doing so might put its anti-Americanism and solidarity with jihadists into jeopardy.

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