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The Nanny State’s Work Is Never Done

The British government is designing plastic glasses for use in pubs because glass is "too dangerous." What's next?

by
Pam Meister

Bio

September 3, 2009 - 12:30 am
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The latest news from the UK is that the Home Office is busying itself with a new pub glass design, the reason for which is to stop glasses from being used as weapons in pub brawls.

The new vessel would be made of shatter-proof plastic because “official figures show 5,500 people are attacked with glasses and bottles every year in England and Wales.”

As one blog commenter said, “If you’re too young to drink from a glass mug safely, you’re too young to be drinking in a pub.”

A representative from the British Beer and Pub Association hopes the new plastic glasses will not become compulsory for a variety of reasons, including extra costs during a recession and the possibility that the quality of the beer or ale would be compromised. This is key because the Brits take their pub experience seriously. A ruined pint is sacrilege.

The designer of the new glass gave a poignant reminder: “Remember that years ago people used to drink out of pewter tankards. It could be quite a significant paradigm shift.”

Yes, but that was because the people themselves, along with industrial advances that made glassware cheaper and more plentiful, engineered that change — not a nanny state obsessed with running citizens’ lives.

Will restaurants and private citizens next be told that they must use plasticware and paper plates? Heaven forbid someone cuts himself or drops a plate that might shatter and create an unsafe situation.

This is how tax dollars are spent in the UK? Remember the town council that spent £2,000 creating and distributing salt shakers with fewer holes in the tops to fish-and-chip shops in an attempt to curb how much customers salt their food?

It’s now official: the British bulldog has no teeth. He’ll have to gum his kibble.

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