There are many other things about Davis’s personal life that Kengor, wisely, does not delve into. They are salacious, and are available from Davis’s own writings, some online.

The communist influence rightfully is the focus. The book is meticulously researched, reasonably argued, and compellingly told, without a hint of sensationalism. The tone is more than sympathetic in terms of placing Davis’ turn to the false god of communism in the historical context of racial discrimination.

Now, with the publication of The Communist, to continue to ignore the evidence would only confirm the willfulness of the blindness.

Mainstream journalists still may ignore or dismiss the evidence presented here. But spread the word about this important book: it contains not only a corrective to the journalistic malpractice we saw in the vetting of candidate Obama, but also a compelling narrative about an important part of our nation’s history. While Obama’s writings (including passages from Dreams) will no doubt continue to be taught uncritically in our nation’s classrooms, students should now have access to Professor Kengor’s exposé. This may be the most captivating and educational book of the election season.