Get PJ Media on your Apple

Shocker! Media Discovers Democratic Corruption in Washington

The rogue's gallery of Democrats with ethics problems is steadily growing.

by
Jennifer Rubin

Bio

June 13, 2009 - 12:00 am
<- Prev  Page 2 of 2   View as Single Page

One can quibble that all that activity (spending and borrowing, mainly) has ignited some popular anger as well. But he and the MSM chorus are onto something.

And with the growth of government and the enormous amount of cash sloshing through Washington, the corruption problem is about to get worse. The stimulus money could, according to the FBI, be the breeding ground for its own crime wave. If the experts are right and 10% of the $787B stimulus plan will be lost to fraud and abuse, then $80B worth of graft and the congressmen, officials, lobbyists, and donors with their fingers in the pie will make fodder for plenty of headlines — just in time for the 2010 races.

No wonder the MSM is nervously sounding the alarm. There is the prospect that the age of “liberal dominance” could come screeching to a halt before it’s even gotten up to speed. Not only does it portend an electoral train wreck and loss of a governing liberal majority, but it sheds doubt on the notion that government was the knight in shining armor needed to ride to the rescue when the free market “failed.” If bigger and bigger government gets us more and more crooks and tens of billions in fraud, then maybe there is a better way to go than inflating the size and scope of the federal government.

Republicans need only do three things. First, force vote after vote, reminding the public who is protecting the crooks. Second, continue to make the connection between the programs the Democrats devised (e.g., the stimulus plan) and the corruption we are now witnessing. And finally, make sure their own house is clean.

If they do that much, 2010 may come to resemble 1994 or 2006.  Proof once again that the key to reclaiming power is waiting for the other guys to mess up.

<- Prev  Page 2 of 2   View as Single Page
Jennifer Rubin blogs at the Washington Post.
Click here to view the 48 legacy comments

Comments are closed.