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Rep. Darrell Issa Confronts Forced Unionism

A new report details thuggish tactics.

by
Patrick Richardson

Bio

March 8, 2012 - 12:00 am
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According to a Jan. 17, 2012, story at Californiahealthline.org, bill SB 411 — backed heavily by SEIU and sponsored by Rep. Curren Price — will likely come up for a vote and will likely force unionization in California.

According to Jordan Lindsey, director of policy and public affairs for the California Association for Health Services at Home, the bill will be expensive — not just for the state, but for home health-care workers as well:

Last year’s estimate from appropriations was that the program would cost about $1 million to start up, and $8 million every year to run the background checks. But new analysis points to a cost of as much as $25 million a year, Lindsey said.

The bill passes some of the cost of the program on to home health care agencies and individuals in the form of licensing fees. “What it breaks down to is about $4,000 a year in licensing fees,” Lindsey said. “I think most of the agencies can do that. But then for every home health aide, it would be another $165 per aide per year.”

And if that turns out to be the cost, he said, that’s a significant burden to agencies. “Basically you’re paying $20,000 a year just to stay in business,” Lindsey said.

Moreover, the bill would require background checks and care instruction for all home health-care workers. Many home workers are parents who have literally been with the patient for his or her entire life and need no care instruction.

Riffey’s case, if the court takes it and decides in her favor, could be a massive blow to unions across the nation, which currently spend massive amounts of member dues to support political causes, primarily those of Democratic representatives.

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Patrick Richardson has been a journalist for almost 15 years and an inveterate geek all his life. He blogs regularly at www.otherwheregazette.com, which aims to be like another SF magazine, just not so serious.
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