Four years after the Pentagon suspended the security clearance of Rahim Sabadia — a South African-born, California-based defense contractor who has bankrolled the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) — new discoveries raise questions about how he had been permitted to hold one in the first place. Documents analyzed by Islamist Watch show that Sabadia’s foundation donated to an infamous Hamas-funding charity and other radicals, that in 1985 he pleaded guilty to the sale of illegal listening devices, and that immigration officials had ordered him out of the country a decade earlier. Topping off this troubling record, Sabadia recently pleaded guilty to providing false information to a Navy procurement officer in a scheme to recapture an old contract. The Sabadia saga is a warning that Islamists and their sympathizers must be kept away from the sensitive technologies and institutions that protect America.

Concerns about Sabadia initially came to light in a 2011 article by Matt Pearce and Brooke Williams for the Orange County Register. While researching the millions of taxpayer dollars that had been flowing to Sabadia’s Sabtech Industries — thanks, in part, to earmarks from Gary Miller, a Republican congressman whose campaign chest was regularly filled by Sabadia and his wife — the journalists learned that Sabadia had lost his secret-level clearance in 2010. As a result, his company had to stop work on a lucrative contract to upgrade the Navy’s Aegis combat system, a key component of ballistic missile defense. Federal agencies did not disclose the reason for the suspension, but Pearce and Williams located an internal email citing worries about “charitable contributions.”

The authors note that Sabadia, via the Sabadia Family Foundation (SFF), distributes money to “many Islamic education, relief, and humanitarian organizations,” and “one of the foundation’s large beneficiaries — receiving at least $1.2 million since 2002 — is the Council on American-Islamic Relations.” CAIR has been on the outs in Washington due to its designation as an unindicted co-conspirator in the case against the Holy Land Foundation, a charity convicted in 2008 of funneling millions to Hamas. In another interesting CAIR–Sabadia link, Omar Zaki, Sabtech’s onetime vice president, is CAIR’s current national chairman.

Sabadia’s massive financing of CAIR, which has reached $1.296 million for its Los Angeles chapter based on available SFF tax filings (2001–12), as well as lesser support for similar Islamist pressure groups, certainly should have grabbed the Defense Department’s attention. However, there have been far more disturbing recipients of the Sabadia family’s largesse.

The most notorious SFF grantee was the Holy Land Foundation itself, which collected $3,300 in 2001, the year that federal authorities finally shut it down. Also enjoying Sabadia’s generosity in 2001 was the American Muslim Foundation, which pocketed $700. That organization was led by the high-profile Islamist Abdurahman Alamoudi, who is now serving a long prison term following his role in an international assassination plot. Additionally, the SFF has gifted $1.177 million (2001–12) to Islamic Relief USA, which is a subsidiary and funder of Islamic Relief Worldwide, a charity that, according to an Americans for Peace and Tolerance report, “has multiple associations with Hamas fundraising and with the Muslim Brotherhood leadership in the U.S., Europe, and Sudan.”

The SFF’s roster of beneficiaries also betrays a fondness for radical mosques and imams. In 2001, the foundation gave $4,500 to Oakland’s Masjid Al-Islam, which, in the words of the Anti-Defamation League, is “affiliated with the anti-Semitic Sabiqun movement, which seeks to establish Islamic rule in the U.S.” Even the Southern Poverty Law Center, known for vilifying critics of Islamism, calls Masjid Al-Islam and the Sabiqun network “hate groups.” In 2002, the SFF sent $100 to defend Jamil al-Amin, an imam convicted that year of the 2000 murder of a Georgia sheriff’s deputy. He has since been identified as the head of the Ummah, another entity striving for an Islamic state within U.S. borders. In 2007, the SFF contributed $25,000 to Brooklyn’s Masjid At-Taqwa, which the New York Police Department classified among the city’s “tier one mosques of concern.” That is largely due to the influence of Imam Siraj Wahhaj, who was listed as one of the “unindicted persons who may be alleged as co-conspirators” in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the foiled follow-up attacks. Wahhaj, too, dreams of a Shari‘a-governed America.

Sabadia’s run-ins with the law should have raised further red flags for those vetting him. On January 21, 1985, Sabadia was hit with a seven-count federal indictment (Central District of Illinois) for selling electronic devices “primarily useful for the purpose of the surreptitious interception of wire or oral communications,” contrary to Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 2512. Investigators had caught him peddling “telephone drop-in FM transmitters,” “ink pen FM transmitters,” and “‘snooper’ contact microphones.” Sabadia pleaded guilty to three counts and was sentenced to three years of probation for each, set to run concurrently, and insignificant fines and restitution.

Besides outing his past criminality, the 1985 court papers expose Sabadia’s former name, Abdur Rahim Noormohamed, which can still be found on various websites. It turns up somewhere else as well: in documents that place Noormohamed/Sabadia at the heart of an immigration dispute during the 1970s.