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PayPal Relents and Apologizes to Pamela Geller

After a day of blogospherical derision, PayPal relented and agreed that Atlas Shrugs is not a "hate site."

by
Patrick Richardson

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June 15, 2010 - 11:32 am
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On Friday, Pamela Geller received word her PayPal account for her website Atlas Shrugs had been restricted. The reason? She was told she had violated PayPal’s Acceptable Use Policy and was promoting hate.

“… [A]fter a recent review of your account, it has been determined that you are currently in violation of PayPal’s Acceptable Use Policy. Under the Acceptable Use Policy, PayPal may not be used to send or receive payments for items that promote hate, violence, racial intolerance or the financial exploitation of a crime,” the email read in part.

“After five years of having PayPal on my site I received notification Friday restricting my website,” Geller said in a telephone interview Monday. “This came out of nowhere.”

In the meantime, as PJM’s Richard Fernandez reported earlier, Revolution Muslim was still being served by PayPal. Revolution Muslim is a site which, among other things, called for the murder of South Park creators Matt Parker and Trey Stone for depicting the Prophet Muhammad in a bear suit and has a picture of President Barack Obama as Adolf Hitler.

“I got called a hate site and yet Revolution Muslim threatens death to the Comedy Central producers and they still take PayPal,” she said. Geller added that the DVDs of Imam Anwar al Awlaki, a jihadist cleric who has been linked to Major Nidal Hasan, the alleged Ft. Hood shooter, are for sale on eBay and can be purchased using PayPal.

“If the real killers can take PayPal then what’s the point of the hate site designation?” Geller asked. Her two other sites were likewise restricted and faced termination of their PayPal accounts. Those sites are for her two nonprofit organizations, Stop the Islamization of America and the Freedom Defense Initiative.

On Monday, after what Geller says was a storm of protest, PayPal backed down.

Geller said she received a phone call from PayPal early Monday morning informing her it had all been a “misunderstanding.”

“They called me back and said it was a misunderstanding and we’re all good,” Geller said. “They obviously received an overwhelming response.”

“I have a pretty big soap box, but what are the little guys supposed to do?”

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