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Obama, Wright, Farrakhan, and Gaddafi

Let's refresh our recollections about the president's connections.

by
Kyle-Anne Shiver

Bio

March 15, 2011 - 12:00 am
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Wright had actually turned over the Trinity pulpit to Louis Farrakhan on a number of occasions. Black Muslims are not only welcomed but play prominently in the workings of Trinity United Church of Christ — as I saw for myself when I visited there in January of 2008.

The church bookstore is filled with black nationalist literature, among which Nation of Islam books are prominently featured, especially those by Malcolm X. Wright was never coy about his “church’s” being a home for the black liberation theology of James H. Cone. The entire offerings of his book store were aimed at the cloaking of racist nationalism with religious trappings. Jeremiah Wright, before he studied for the “Christian ministry,” earned a master’s degree in Islamic studies at the University of Chicago. Black liberation theology is, in Cone’s own words, an attempt to forge the Christianity of Martin Luther King, Jr. with the black nationalist Muslim creed of Malcolm X.

Louis Farrakhan, in early 2008, made a public announcement that he was indeed backing Barack Obama’s candidacy and throwing the weight of the black Muslim (Nation of Islam) community in with Obama. Russert asked Obama whether he would then publicly disclaim this support and formally reject it. And Obama performed one of his now all-too-familiar verbal two-steps, saying, “I have been very clear in my denunciation of Minister Farrakhan’s anti-Semitic comments. I think they are unacceptable and reprehensible […]. I obviously can’t censor him, but it is not support that I sought […].”

Careful listeners noted that Barack Obama never dropped the honorific “Minister” when referring to Farrakhan.

Russert wouldn’t let it go at that, though. He reminded Obama that his own pastor and spiritual mentor, Jeremiah Wright, had gone with Louis Farrakhan in 1984 to visit Gaddafi — and had later said that when Obama’s opponents found out about it, his “Jewish support would dry up quicker than a snowball in hell.”

Obama responded to this with more two-stepping: “Some of my strongest support in this campaign is from the Jewish community […] and the reason is because I have been a stalwart friend of Israel’s. I think they are one of our most important allies in the region and I think their security is sacrosanct.”

So there. Only now that Barack Obama is president of the United States, that fervent statement of support for Israel seems a bit insincere to say the least.

And now that the entire Middle East is a roiling cauldron of unrest, Barack Obama’s leadership seems to be AWOL. Israel’s security very much depends upon which forces emerge victorious in the various countries in her region. And Barack Obama’s actions regarding Farrakhan’s friend, Gaddafi, now seem questionable at best.

As a citizen, I am now asking whether we Americans should not have been so quick to discount all those troublesome associations of Obama’s. In reality, his actions as president, especially regarding foreign policy, seem to be much more in keeping with those “God damn America” proclamations from Wright and those anti-Semitic Muslim diatribes of Farrakhan’s than they are with Obama’s stated denouncements of both.

This is not looking good. In world affairs, there is truly nothing worse than an adolescent mindset coupled with enormous power. It’s rarely a good idea to give one’s car keys to the local gang leader.

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Kyle-Anne Shiver is an independent citizen journalist. She is a frequent contributor to PJ Media and American Thinker. She blogs at www.commonsenseregained.com.
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