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Obama Determined to Pass Government-Funded Preschool Plan

President says U.S. isn’t offering enough kids educational opportunities at a time when they are “just sponges soaking stuff in.”

by
Bill Straub

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February 20, 2013 - 12:12 am
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WASHINGTON – President Obama is pushing ahead with a proposal to establish a government-funded pre-kindergarten education program across the country to enhance learning opportunities for under-privileged and middle-class children despite critics who question the efficacy of the initiative.

Obama used his State of the Union address to extol the virtues of early childhood education and announced plans to provide opportunities for children as young as 3 to participate. He expanded on his proposal during a Feb. 14 speech in Decatur, Ga., asserting that “education has to start at the earliest possible age.”

The president claimed every dollar invested in high-quality pre-kindergarten education ultimately saves more than $7 by, among other things, boosting graduation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, and reducing violent crime. Yet the U.S. isn’t offering enough kids educational opportunities at a time when they are “just sponges soaking stuff in.”

“Most middle-class parents can’t afford a few hundred bucks a week for private preschool,” Obama said. “And for the poor children who need it the most, the lack of access to a great preschool education can have an impact on their entire lives. And we all pay a price for that. And as I said, this is not speculation. Study after study shows the achievement gap starts off very young.”

The White House has released the outline of a plan that would expand pre-K access to practically every youngster in the country. The package comes without a specific price tag although some estimates have placed it at about $10 billion.

Obama is recommending the creation of a cost-sharing arrangement with the states through the U.S. Department of Education to offer early childhood education opportunities to 4-year-olds from low- and moderate-income families. States would receive an unspecified incentive if they included middle-class kids in the program.

In order to qualify for the federal monies states would be required to establish that their pre-K programs adopt standards for early learning, hire qualified teachers, and create an assessment program to chart success or failure. The states also would be encouraged under the proposal to set up all-day kindergarten programs.

Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst, director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution, reported that 39 states now offer state-funded pre-K, with 31 of those states having programs that are targeted for low-income families. The National Institute for Early Education Research, a research center at Rutgers University in New Jersey, reported that as of 2011 four percent of the nation’s 3-year-olds and 28 percent of 4-year-olds were enrolled in some sort of state-supported preschool education program totaling more than 1.3 million children. Only 12 states, according to NIEER, provided enough per-child funding to meet established quality standards.

Whitehurst said when children enrolled in Head Start and other public programs, including special education, are combined with those in state-funded pre-K, 42 percent of the nation’s 4-year-olds are enrolled in a taxpayer funded, center-based preschool programs.

“Even as the nation begins to emerge from the economic downturn, few states are adding significantly to enrollment and the educational quality of state pre-K is taking a backseat to budget cutting—even though the number of students who need good preschool programs has risen,” the organization said in its report, “The State of Pre-School 2011.”

Education experts generally lauded Obama’s proposal.

“Long ago, we mistakenly believed that children did not really learn anything until the ‘age of reason’ at 7,” said Kenneth Dodge, an expert on early childhood development at Duke University in Durham, NC. “Now we know that early experiences are crucial to lifelong outcomes. We now have evidence that high-quality preschool experiences improve academic outcomes that persist at least through third grade. If we are investing in education from kindergarten forward, we should invest in preschool as a way to improve those outcomes.”

W. Steven Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research, said he was thrilled by the commitment from the White House.

“The president’s pre-K proposal would help states provide high-quality preschool education for low- and middle-income families, which is crucial considering that children of lower income groups start kindergarten more than a year behind in language and math than their upper income peers,” Barnett said.

“Among children from low-income families, more than one in three attends no preschool program at age 4 and most who do attend a program do not receive a high-quality education.”

The administration’s plan, he said, “will put children on an early path to success. This proposal improves opportunity for everyone, offering a hand up to lower and middle-income families that will help them reach the American dream.”

But support was hardly unanimous and there already is an indication that the White House package will encounter problems making it through the Republican-controlled House. Critics cite problems with Head Start, a Great Society program that offers education, health and nutrition services to low-income children and their families, as a reason to be wary of government-supported pre-K.

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Top Rated Comments   
I just want to post any old comment so I can see how many "likes" I get with the new comment rating system. Who's with me? Now I just need to think of something to post....
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The government should also provide them with uniforms, so that no child is dressed "better" than another child. In fact, they should also get uniforms in all years of school. Oh, and free copies of "Dreams from My Father" since it's a brilliant book. In fact, it would be a useful exercise for them to memorize passages in "Dreams" and repeat them in unison during morning exercise sessions (after all, we must defeat obesity, and how much better our efforts would be if the children exercised under official direction at school!)

Somehow, my ideas all sound familiar, but, mein gott, I cannot remember where it is I'd heard them before.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Comrades, we must begin indoctrination of our children soldiers at a much earlier age if we are to control the peasants.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (40)
All Comments   (40)
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Sounds like a brilliant way to:
-redistribute some money
-insure more jobs for teachers' union and SEIU members
-get professional indoctrination, ah, that is, professional teaching (same thing)
into 'em in their formative years
-reduce parental influence, especially any of that religious stuff
-rob the little things of even more of their childhood
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The plan satisfies the Prime Directive: Add more government employees. It also satisfies its evil sidekick, add more Union Employees (SEIU).

Head Start sounded like the greatest thing since sliced bread. Then one finds out it is aimed at the pre-schoolers, a fatal flaw. It should have been aimed at the moms. That is like correcting the aim of the revolver. Aimed at pre-schoolers is like changing the aim of a bullet after leaving the barrel.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
IF our public education system had any clue about what high quality preschool education actually is, I would say, okay, begin to implement such a plan very slowly, but through the states, not the federal government. Some countries do have useful preschool programs. But under our current circumstances, I say no, no, no, no and no. Get the federal out of education. Even if education were a federal responsibility, they are completely incapable of managing anything properly. And we cannot afford even one new program.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Is it terribly old fashioned of me to say that 3 and 4 year olds belong at home with mama and siblings learning about family, themselves, nature, play, and cooperation? What the hell happened?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
One more year of indoctrination. If my kids were starting today I'd homeschool.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I just want to post any old comment so I can see how many "likes" I get with the new comment rating system. Who's with me? Now I just need to think of something to post....
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"The president claimed every dollar invested in high-quality pre-kindergarten education ultimately saves more than $7 by, among other things, boosting graduation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, and reducing violent crime."
-and where exactly does he get these figures? The Land of Cotton Candy Statistics?
"Yet the U.S. isn’t offering enough kids educational opportunities at a time when they are 'just sponges soaking stuff in.'”
-(incipit "Jaws Theme"...)
"'Most middle-class parents can’t afford a few hundred bucks a week for private preschool,' Obama said."
-so folksy, so plain talkin'; but his numbers are based on his own children's elite Georgetown private schools, not those out here in The Jungle.
"And we all pay a price for that. "
-hence the government's compelling financial interest justifying intervention.
"Obama is recommending the creation of a cost-sharing arrangement with the states through the U.S. Department of Education ..."
-yeah, that worked like a charm with the Obamacare exchanges, didn't it?
"Education experts generally lauded Obama’s proposal."
-if you consider teachers' union leaders "education experts"...
"“Long ago, we mistakenly believed that children did not really learn anything until the ‘age of reason’ at 7,” said Kenneth Dodge, an expert on early childhood development at Duke University ..."
-he must be talking about mid-19th-century Industrial-Revolutionary England. I think we all have come around to Charles Dickens' way of thinking by now...
"'Among children from low-income families, more than one in three attends no preschool program at age 4 and most who do attend a program do not receive a high-quality education.'"
-and the Obama administration is determined to make the blessings of not receiving a high-quality education to every American Sponge.

I could go on but I'm starting to get dizzy from all the lies. This guy is a cross between Harry Belafonte and Josef Stalin. God help America. (show less)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
so the solution to the problem is to expand the failure that is the public school system, but at least recognize that they want more union members.

And the studies on the success of head start programs show that the benefits aren't there long term, anyone surprised that big government program doesn't work save a job program for union workers?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The government should also provide them with uniforms, so that no child is dressed "better" than another child. In fact, they should also get uniforms in all years of school. Oh, and free copies of "Dreams from My Father" since it's a brilliant book. In fact, it would be a useful exercise for them to memorize passages in "Dreams" and repeat them in unison during morning exercise sessions (after all, we must defeat obesity, and how much better our efforts would be if the children exercised under official direction at school!)

Somehow, my ideas all sound familiar, but, mein gott, I cannot remember where it is I'd heard them before.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Actually I'm pro-uniforms in schools. It takes a good bit of financial pressure off the parents to buy designer clothes for their kids to wear at school and alleviates any "dess code" issues in the form of inappropriate slogans, revealing clothes, etc. The kids are there to learn not be on an episode of Bratz.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sorry to have confused the issue. I would agree that school uniforms take away a lot of problems. I was angling for the Komsomol or Hitler Youth angle in federally-supplied uniforms.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Mandatory uniforms are just a tax (or payoff) paid to a preferred vendor.

I lived through mandatory public school uniforms for 4 kids. They were over priced and the quality stunk. My boys pants never fit properly and were full of holes in the first 3 or 4 days. Then there are those wonderful times when you're kids change sizes every month. On the other hand, the clothes I purchased at the 2nd hand store for a few dollars lasted them for months and a size change didn't require a whole new wardrobe.

This is what you call a window dressing idea - it looks pretty on the surface but does nothing to improve the quality of education or the safety of the school.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sounds like you experienced a failiure of implementation not a failure of the idea. First, you make the uniforms the same county wide or even statewide, not on a per school basis. Second, make the uniforms simple to comply with, navy blue slacks & a white polo shirt for example, and available from multiple vendors or even retail stores. The wide implemetation would have the uniforms available in the 2nd hand stores, Goodwill, or Salvation Army after a year or two. The first year would be most difficult from that aspect.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
You are so full of bull pucky. One of us lived through "failed implementation" for 15 years. A normal year worth of public school uniforms ran me about $400 a child. One pair of khaki Dockers ran about $30 at the least expensive retail store in town. Shirts, sweaters and girls skirts could only be purchased from the one approved district vendor. Our district has 40 schools and we're the smallest one in the city.

The whole uniform thing is driven by administration egos - no two campuses will dare have a similar uniform. And you can't buy them 2nd hand, because the quality is so bad that they fall apart long before you get around to donating them. By the 4th week, they were in such poor shape that I was constantly embarrassed by my children's appearance.

Our district has had mandatory uniforms for 24 years. We have major discipline and gang problems that were not "magically solved" by uniforms. Every kid still knows who's parents are better off and worse off. Test scores have been in a spiral and drop rates are through the roof. And I live in the good school district with the higher incomes.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Weird my previous comment didn't show so after hitting refresh a few time I reworte it. Sorry for the multiple posts.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
With uniforms being more preveleant you'd find them at second hand stores. Also you go with a basic uniform that can be provided by many companies not a specific one. You're talking about failure of implementation, not failure of the idea itself.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
With uniforms being more preveleant you'd find them at second hand stores. Also you go with a basic uniform that can be provided by many companies not a specific one. You're talking about failure of implementation, not failure of the idea itself.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
With uniforms being more preveleant you'd find them at second hand stores. Also you go with a basic uniform that can be provided by many companies not a specific one. You're talking about failure of implementation, not failure of the idea itself.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
We pour more and more money down a rathole and wonder at the results. We spend more than the countires we trail behind but get so much less for our money.

We require too much education for the tasks preformed by teachers at early grade levels, education that the school systems often pay for. What does a teacher that is basically a glorified baby sitter need a Bachelors, Masters, or even PhD for? That is your "early education", they basically babysit the kids, teach them their alphabet, counting, and how to tie their shoes. I know because my wife has done it and described her day to me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Well, there's more to it than babysitting and teaching the alphabet. Preschool teachers that are doing the job well also screen for delays and disabilities, which can be dealt with and corrected if found early. Parents often don't see these issues because they've been accommodating the child unknowingly.
I'm not agreeing that the government should provide it, I'm just explaining the value of it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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