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Norquist to PJM: ‘Robust Guest-Worker Program’ More Important Than ‘Big Wall’

“Immigration is what’s made us economically strong, politically strong, militarily strong, culturally cohesive and strong.”

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Nicholas Ballasy

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June 26, 2013 - 12:40 am
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Addressing the debate over immigration reform in the Senate, Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, told PJ Media that the best way to secure the border is through a “robust” guest-worker program.

PJ Media asked Norquist if he agrees with conservative lawmakers who want the border secure first before a pathway to citizenship is offered to illegal immigrants.

“They’re working out something that answers that question on the Senate side and point of fact, the most important thing is a guest-worker program like Eisenhower had. The way you have a secure border is have people walk through doors with permits to work so you see them all and you know who they are,” Norquist said on Capitol Hill.

“You can tighten border security, but the actual way to control the border is with a robust guest worker program. The other stuff looks nice, ‘oh, it’s a big wall,’ but that’s not what gives you border security. So, we should do both — have border security and fences or whatever and a robust guest-worker program.”

He also said arrests at the border rose after President Lyndon B. Johnson ended the Bracero guest-worker program.

Norquist, known for influencing conservative politicians to take pledges not to increase taxes, said immigration reform that includes a pathway to citizenship is “good” for economic growth.

“I think it’s good policy. I think it’s good for growth. I think it’s good for the budget and all those sorts of things because people are an asset rather than a liability. I mean, people go, ‘should we have immigration?’ It’s like asking McDonald’s, ‘should we do hamburgers?’” Norquist said.

“It is the secret sauce. It’s what makes us different from everybody else.”

To back up his argument, Norquist compared the U.S. to China.

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Top Rated Comments   
This argument is farce. There is very little about the current state of affairs that resemble previous eras of immigration. a massive welfare state, cultural disintegration and rule by political, judicial fiat and stifling regulation. Another way of considering this is that Mexico offloaded 20% of its population compromised on low or unskilled people with no objection from America; why? Because its serves the interest of the political ruling class and their patrons.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Somebody needs to remind Norquist that we no longer have a frontier that needs populating, nor do we have a growing demand for un-skilled and semi-skilled labor in our factories.
And, with so many citizens unemployed, we don't need a guest workers. We need to get Americans to do those jobs.
We also don't need employers dumping their labor costs on the public while keeping the profits of cheap labor private.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Save you breath, Norq. We demand that the border security LAWS already on the books be ENFORCED. Period.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (40)
All Comments   (40)
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Nice beard.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
HOW DARE YOU!.......THE NYTIMES,4/28,2013, SUNDAY REVIEW, page 11, col2,"When Assimilation Stalls" by Ross Douthat, NY times columnist. "The Mexican American illegal alien current STALL OUT could continue given the trends-unemployment,family breakdown,weakening communal ties-already working against social mobility in America" You insulting research is based upon mental bubbles in the mind of swhoiever did your research sir!!
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
This boob (G.N.) is walking, talking proof that the establishment republicans are almost, not exactly, but almost as out of touch with the ordinary working Americans as the democrats. They are fighting to maintain their control over us simply to do their bidding. They despise and disrespect us while supporting a bloated, oppressive leviathan government to keep us "in our place" like good little uneducated, ignorant sheeple. Well, they are truly the ignorant ones if they believe they can win the office of dog catcher without our support. Like Beck said, "We are tired of the lies coming out of Washington, DC." Grover, you and your fellow establishment a$$ kissers like Rove better wise up fast; the "ignorant, uneducated sheeple" are onto you and your scam. We're tired of the scams and the "compromises" aka: caving in to the dems.

Remember BENGHAZI!
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Too much of a 'good' thing, Grover, too much of a 'good' thing can easily become toxic in all the areas you mentioned.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
If Norquist had his way, the Saudi Flag would be flying over our WH.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
OK, I can kinda, sorta see highly skilled guest workers in tech fields and such if we really don't have them here, though I doubt that is really the case. We just don't have the cheap ones here. I don't see it for unskilled, and low-skilled workers. I see lodges and other resorts here in Alaska importing labor on H1B(?) visas for menial jobs like house-keeping, luggage handling, wait staff and the like, mostly Eastern Europeans. Maybe American young people won't do that sort of work any more, or not enough of them anyway, but I think they're cheap and if they try to defy the employer in any way, they just get sent back.

Now, I've hired and had to deal with enough home grown entry-level workers right out of high school or college and I'm well aware that few of them are prizes, but that's a problem that needs to be solved on it own, not by employers just going around the problem with "guest workers" and illegals.

I have no sympathy for the agriculture and food processing industries on this issue either. Take away the peon labor and the farmers will automate picking their fruit and vegetables. Growing up in The South in the '50s and into the '60s it was an article of faith that tobacco could only be cultivated, harvested, and cured by hand and only if you had very large even shaped fields coulld cotton cultivation and harvesting be automated. Well the Civil Rights Act and Great Society programs took away cheap Black agricultural labor and human hands haven't touched tobacco or cotton since the early '70s/ The California and other Western farmers will figure it out.

A chicken processing plant near my hometown in Georgia made the National news a few years ago when INS raided it and found dozens of illegals working there. Of course there was the usual chorus from business that they had to resort to illegals because no legal residents would take the work. It may be that nobody would work under the sweat shop conditions they can impose on people who have no recourse. All it takes is a threat to call INS and the guy forgets about that on the job injury or the fact that he's paid less than the minumum wage or gets no overtime pay. Southern businesses threatening to to replace white workers with blacks caused the wage death spiral in The South, the end of which was one of the reasons behind enactment of the Fair Labor Standards Act in '38, establishing inter alia, a mimimum wage and overtime pay at time and a half over 40 hours/week. Funny thing, when that chicken plant reopened with a lot of attention from law enforcement, INS, and the Labor department, they had absolutely no difficulty filling those jobs with legal workers. And just to be fair, fish processing plants and factory ships here in Alaska and its waters are just as bad or worse for using illegals and much harder for INS to get to and check up on. It used to be a rite of passage for young people in Alaska and the West Coast to spend some time on the slime lines in Alaska canneries, but now most of the canneries are gone and most of the work is done on factory vessels using labor of dubious origin.

Norquist and other business interests are on the wrong side of the times and to my mind are on the wrong side of the moral issue. These businesses want immigrant labor because it is cheaper and much less susceptible to unionization or to being organized politically. If a worker is in the Country and holding a job only at your sufferance, you can pretty much treat him as you please, and that is what they want. These exploitative companies are off-loading all the social and infrastructure costs of the imported illegal labor on the society at large and pocketing the profits. We should not be on their side.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
I mean no offense to the Vietnamese Boat People but I use them as a Time marker but since 1975 we have seen an incredible decline in assimilation nor do we seem to encourage it. It is assumed that all who violate our borders are here to become Americans, I do not see much of this at all. 59 years in Southern California and I think I have observed incredible isolation. Those professing for reform also carry Mexican Flags and talk of reconquista. Our schools do little to raise new Americans either. Americans of all ethnicities have lost the ideal of "Honest Work" and replaced it with an entitlement mentality, how long before this wave of border violators produce entitlement offspring? Besides with most of our manufacturing going to Mexico I may be moving south soon.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
This argument is farce. There is very little about the current state of affairs that resemble previous eras of immigration. a massive welfare state, cultural disintegration and rule by political, judicial fiat and stifling regulation. Another way of considering this is that Mexico offloaded 20% of its population compromised on low or unskilled people with no objection from America; why? Because its serves the interest of the political ruling class and their patrons.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Also, when the economy sucks and unemployment is high, with a guest worker program, those workers could go back to Mexico, Colombia or wherever. They could return when there were more jobs. Since all 11 million of them are stuck here illegally, they've already created the high unemployment people are complaining of, and they've already put many citizens out of work. If they could leave, knowing they could come back legally, some would.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
The major advantage of a robust guest worker program over amnesty is that the illegal immigrants will go back and forth legally. Right now, once they're here, they can't go back. It was dumped decades ago because it was abused by some in agriculture to squeeze their workers, providing atrocious working and living conditions in exchange for the ability to stay and work in the US. If they could do it and get it right, we wouldn't have as many becoming permanent illegal immigrants. They would be able to choose whether to stay or go.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
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