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Lynn Jenkins (R-KS): Time to Make Case for Abolishing IRS

She also wants the resignation of Eric Holder, which she demanded two years ago.

by
Patrick Richardson

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June 3, 2013 - 12:00 pm
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Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins (R-KS), a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, tells PJ Media that the ongoing IRS scandal must be a wake-up call for reform to the tax system:

The whole IRS scandal, it screams for comprehensive tax reform … so the IRS never has this power again to reach into the lives of the American people. At the heart of all these scandals is a government that has gotten too big, too unruly. It’s run amok. We have to get to the bottom of this, we have to hold people responsible, and we have to make sure this never happens again.

If ever there was a time to make the case for a fair tax or a flat tax and abolishing the IRS, this would be it.

Jenkins is against the appointment of a special prosecutor for investigating the IRS, as Congress has oversight power and the power to subpoena witnesses:

When we had the first hearing at Ways and Means, we ended up with more questions than answers. Our committees are going to get to the bottom of this.

Kansas Senator Jerry Moran (R) says he is just as concerned about the IRS targeting:

I serve on the Appropriations Committee, and even before the so-called apology from the IRS I was questioning the secretary of the Treasury and the acting director of the IRS about complaints.

Moran says the IRS officials he was questioning told him they would get back to him with answers. Instead, two days later the “apology” was issued:

What that says to me is there is great credibility in the complaints. It has a lot to do with an apparent political operation in the Obama administration.

Jenkins says that despite the growing calls for a special prosecutor — a recent poll said 76 percent of Americans would favor the appointment of one — she and her colleagues are not sanguine about going that route for one reason: Attorney General Eric Holder. A special prosecutor would need to be appointed by Holder, who finds himself embattled over the seizure of phone records from the Associated Press and other news organizations, including Fox News. Jenkins says she and most of her colleagues have no confidence in Holder’s veracity, and that letting Holder appoint a special prosecutor would be throwing good money after bad. The investigation could cost in the neighborhood of $10 million or more and possibly take years to complete, with no guarantee the facts would actually come out. Jenkins:

We don’t have to be at the mercy of Eric Holder.

Further, she feels the outrage over the politically motivated targeting is generally uniform throughout the House:

I think there’s enormous bipartisan outrage. This transcends party lines. We would be just as outraged if they were targeting liberal organizations.

She believes the recent scandals are not isolated, but symptomatic:

I think it’s indicative of a big government that’s high on power. All of these things make the case for a smaller, less intrusive government.

Jenkins has wanted Eric Holder gone for years, and absolutely wants him gone over these scandals:

I asked for his resignation two years ago. I think it’s high time to let someone else lead Justice. That’s what the American people want — accountability.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
The problem with the sales tax system is that it can become just as manipulative and abusive as the income tax. Just look at Europe and realize that their VAT systems started out as "just a simple little sales tax."

One flat rate for all, forever. Any new rate hikes are finite and must be voted on by the people.

People who feel they are too poor to handle the tax rate can opt out for a loss of voting rights until they have opted back in for a full election cycle.

No taxation; no representation. But any loss of taxation and representation is voluntary and optional and can be made temporary.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
talk is cheap..is there one congress member or senate member who has ever voted to get rid of the IRS?? NO!! AND WHY? Because they would not be able to shower favors on those who give them large campaign contributions..A flat tax would cure almost every "ILL" we have. The other cure would be to "limit" liability in lawsuits..Not going to happen and Americans will continue to get screwed by these political pigs feeding at the trough of taxpayers expense
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (45)
All Comments   (45)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
The government gravy train won't end unless we the people have a massive tax revolt, don't file taxes anymore until all the degenerate incumbents are voted out.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
I think it would help if both parties quit hating the USA and quit recruiting malcontent half wits with not a shred of nobility in their blood.
But if you are really that anti government privatize armies and police forces first. That will end your 'Big' government.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, disband the IRS. Make my tax form a post card with 4 lines.

1. How much did you make?
2. Multiply #1 by .15
3. Pay the result.
4. Signature.


No deductions for anything. Corporate rate same as personal rate. IRS would become an agency of about 12 people.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Riiiight. We go into the Beltway Temple and tip over the moneychangers tables. We all know how that story ends. The Punchless Pilots of Congress wash their hands of us...we end up carrying the cross to our own horrific end.

It takes a much more special individual to make this trip worthwhile. I'm not worthy. Soulless persecutors have not changed in 2000 years. And fighting the forces of a dictator hasn't changed much either.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
'Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it despair', my friend. We can yet change things if we're willing to work for it.
Stay engaged. Join a conservative group, like True the Vote or the American Enterprise Institute. Work to further their goals. Write your Congressional reps. Vote. Keep yourself informed on the issues.
But most importantly, don't give up and don't surrender. The Greeks refused to give up at Thermopylae. Americans refused to give up in 1775 and again after Pearl Harbor -- and all 3 stubborn refusals forever changed the world.

PS -- on a minor historical note, Jesus upset the moneychangers' tables in the Temple more than 400 years before the end of the Western Roman Empire. Apples and oranges.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Only the rich and the politically connected benefit from our current travesty of tax law. Consider the examples of GE and Google, paying almost no corporate taxes...and on the income tax side, my personal tax rate was higher than Obama's, and he grossed more than I did last year.
We're following the same path as the Western Roman Empire. Their taxes became so onerous that rich Romans either found ways to pay no taxes or emigrated, the middle class all but disappeared, and the poor welcomed the Germanic barbarians because they collected almost no taxes at all.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
I hate to tell you this, but no corporation actually pays taxes, that is passed on to their customers and is part of the price of every good or service you buy. The problem with high corporate tax rates is it an effective tax on consumers above and beyond the over taxation we already deal with.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Bingo on that observation. It's actually worse in that high corporate taxes can also scrub jobs away from the middle and lower classes due to foreign competition.

The fact is that almost all of the deleterious affects of our current taxation system are shouldered by the private sector middle and lower classes. The wealthy and the public sector absolutely do not care a whit about income tax rates. The former just practice income avoidance and the later have negotiated cost of living adjustments, lifetime pensions and benefits, etc.

My suggestion would be to de-unionize the public sector and then to base taxes on wealth not on income. Yes that would be more invasive, but you would see everything cleaned up overnight as the unholy alliance between the wealthy and the political elites went down the toilet.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
And before the IRS is abolished, make damn sure the IRS is kept out of Obummercare.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
"... reform to the tax system" in the quote/article, no no no, as you say, ABOLISH. Rebuild from the ground up (one page at most); "reform" just means Congress adds in new freebies for self and friends, makework for accountants and lawyers.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Time to make the case? I'd say that case is made and proved.

forget the flat tax or fair tax. A 10% federal sales tax.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
The problem with the sales tax system is that it can become just as manipulative and abusive as the income tax. Just look at Europe and realize that their VAT systems started out as "just a simple little sales tax."

One flat rate for all, forever. Any new rate hikes are finite and must be voted on by the people.

People who feel they are too poor to handle the tax rate can opt out for a loss of voting rights until they have opted back in for a full election cycle.

No taxation; no representation. But any loss of taxation and representation is voluntary and optional and can be made temporary.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
A VAT is not a retail sales tax. On the contrary, it's a statist's dream tax. The only thing more oppressive than a VAT is an income tax.

A flat retail sales tax, exactly like we have in most of our states, works very well.

Perfectly? No, but very well.

No income tax can EVER destroy the power of the IRS, no matter how you tinker with it.
45 weeks ago
45 weeks ago Link To Comment
Your suggestion of a new structure 'voted on by the people' to increase, is 'unconstitutional' in somuchas the constitution give the the congress the authority to set and collect taxes. I know you must have just had a momentary laspe. :)
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
And such a flat rate is ultimately regressive, which will repress upward economic mobility.
Tying it to voting rights will exacerbate class and age warfare, as people who had to give up their voting rights to gain economic mobility will see themselves having to surrender them again as they age, creating resentment for the first loss and guaranteeing resistance to allowing the second loss.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
True but irrelevant. Consider the remedy the lesser by far of two evils;
'If This Goes On' many poor and old will be too dead to resent or resist.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
If the intent is to make the system more "fair", how exactly can those negatives be irrelevant?

Increasing the class and age disparity and conflict has inevitably made such "remedies" the greater by far of two evils, with many rich and young too dead in the resistance incited by the resentment to benefit.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
A 10 percent flat tax ultimately means lower income people, which frankly includes me, end up paying less, both in absolute dollars and as a function of percentage of wages than they do now.

It also eliminates the huge tax "returns" many receive which amount to more than they actually paid in.

Seems reasonably fair to me.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
$1,000 when you are taking in $20,000 is far more significant in terms of disposable income and saving than $100,000 when you are taking in $2,000,000.
For lower income people, which frankly includes me as well, such disparity will only inhibit potential, and is far from fair, reasonably or otherwise.

As for eliminating huge tax returns, that is a separate consideration.
It is quite easy to have both a simple rate system and a progressive rate system at the same time.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
You'll note that I said a 10 percent flat tax. Yes a flat tax in theory hits the average joe harder than Bill Gates, however when you realize that you're currently paying, irrespective of gas taxes, sales taxes, etc. about 1/3 of your check in taxes, a flat tax actually means more money in your pocket, not less.

BTW, your effective tax rate, after adding in all the various consumption taxes we pay and taxes masquerading as "fees", is about 50 percent.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
By the way, Eric Holder will still be AG on the day Obama leaves office. That's my wager.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
>>"Senator Moran did not ask for Holder’s resignation..."

You've got to be kidding. Really? There are Republicans NOT calling for his resignation? Exhibit #4,650 why we're losing.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
A "flat tax" does NOTHING to curb the power of the IRS. It's not even a good start.

As long as there is an income tax, ANY KIND of income tax, the government has the legal right to know your income and ALL THE DETAILS OF YOUR INCOME, along with all the power which is needed to exercise that legal right. THIS is the power that is being abused.

The AMOUNT of the income tax and how "fairly" it is assessed is completely irrelevant.


Only a retail sales tax is anonymous. Only a retail sales tax pulls the fangs of the IRS.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Of course a retail sales tax is not anonymous to retailers, and is regressive not just on smaller earners but smaller retailers as well.
You will cut the legs out from under the small business owner and struggling 20-something in your quest to pull the fangs of the IRS.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Hogwash and bogeymen, as usual, from the purveyors and protectors of the tax system that Marx built, the income tax.

High ticket luxury items are more adversely affected by a sales tax than commodities such as food, and it's childishly simple to give a prebate to equal the amount of tax paid on necessities, thus providing a huge BOON to the poorest people in the country, the ones the "progressives" pretend to care about.

The retail sales tax isn't a perfect system, of course, but it perfectly eliminates the government being involved in managing personal financial matters which are none of its business.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Both small business and entrants to the job market must be sacrificed
to the greater good; This is a Progressive Credo.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Ah!
So eliminating the IRS and income tax is a "Progressive" plan.
Which of course is why I oppose it.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
I agree.

And we should be taxing consumption rather than investment income anyway. Other nations are outperforming us because we keep trying to prop up our economy with conspicuous consumption fueled by debt.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why should we be taxing consumption?
Is consumption somehow morally wrong?
What exactly is all that investment supposed to produce if not more to consume?
But you want to tax consumption, reducing demand for products to consume, reducing the demand for investment to produce consumables.
Instead we get conspicuous consumption of luxuries, which apparently is wrong and so must be taxed from a class warfare basis, though of course that then reduces investment income, while repressing consumption and increasing class warfare envy.
Yes, that will certainly turn out well.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Your screen name should be BronxMarxist.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Focus on the difference between consumer and capital goods
then take a good long look at the service economy; It is going
away, soon, along with conspicuous consumption.
Economy 101, BZ; Needs, Wants, and luxuries in that order,
in a cash, or better a 'pay first' economy; No more credit cards.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
History 501 along with Economics 101 tells us that eliminating the consumer economy leads to Manorialism and similar lousy systems all the way down to Subsistence Level Barter.
I'll take the Consumer System, thank you.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
No, what a consumption tax does is tax all levels and tax even those who make their money illegally or in the black market. And I am all for that.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well no, it won't tax those trading on the black market, and so will actually encourage it. Look at Greece for how that is working out. Why would anyone be all for that?
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
No system is perfect. However, the retail sales tax is already working VERY well in most of our states.

Is it working perfectly? No. Is there cheating? Yes.

But it's still far FAR better than any income tax.
45 weeks ago
45 weeks ago Link To Comment
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