“Suing over the back-and-forth of public discourse,” Steyn writes, “turns the entire citizenry into an enfeebled child.…To litigate every offence is to give a not especially distinguished judiciary the power to micro-regulate social relations.” Steyn knows whereof he speaks for he is once again being sued, not by a Muslim for a change, but by climate “warm-monger” and false Nobel laureate Michael Mann. Levant is also back in court, being sued by a former plaintiff in the MacLean’s burlesque, one Khurrum Awan, who is not a putative climate specialist but an actual Muslim. At least he is sticking to the standard plot line. Levant had called Awan “a liar,” an epithet corroborated by the fact that Awan, as Steyn comments, had been shown in the original proceeding to have “been guilty of telling an untruth about one of the central facts in the case.” Awan complained that as a result of Levant’s ostensible slur, he has been “shunned by his friends.” This palpably nonsensical, self-pitying and surely non-justiciable bleat may cost Levant another $100,000 in Canada’s superannuated justice system. “This is called lawfare,” Levant explains on his blog. “Muslim extremists who enjoy Canada’s free speech for themselves, seek to take it away from their Canadian critics. Using our own laws.” Once again, mission accomplished. Awan had boasted after the original trial: “We attained our strategic objective — to increase the cost of publishing anti-Islamic material.”

Such trials have become part of the cultural atmosphere everywhere in the West. One thinks of the ridiculous charges levied against public figures like Geert Wilders in Holland, Lars Hedegaard in Denmark, and Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff in Austria, among others, for telling self-evident truths about Islam. Trials are also conducted in the court of public opinion. One recalls in this connection the sanctimonious venom heaped upon Pastor Terry Jones for exercising his Constitutional rights in burning a Koran, whereby Westerners accept the Muslim claim of the inviolability of their Holy Book. The exception is when Muslims themselves are lighting the fire, as in the case of  Arsala Jamal, the enlightened governor of an Afghan province, who was blown up in a mosque by a bomb planted under the pulpit — in effect, an exploding Koran, as Daniel Greenfield puts it — to scarcely a tongue-clucking in the legacy media, let alone the acknowledgment of so hypocritical a discrepancy.

Apparently, for many Muslims engaged in prosecuting their wars, schisms and sectarian vendettas, the Holy Book is not all that holy and can be torched at will. Western infidels, however, are appalled when one of their own is implicated. What we are witnessing is not only political correctness, which is mad enough, but political correctness gone even madder owing to the worst kind of obsequiousness and pietistic humbug, namely, condemning our own while refusing to offend the enemy even at his most murderous and morally rebarbative. We are now in league, in every conceivable way, with a violent and primordial part of the human family. The vocal exceptions are too few and too marginalized to make any compelling difference.

But far too many of us, and especially those in political office, will admit neither the present nor historical nature of a perennially aggressive and totalitarian faith. It comes as no surprise that Christine Melnick, Immigration and Multiculturalism minister of the province of Manitoba, proclaimed October as Islamic History Month. (Manitoba is the first province to implement the provisions of Islamic History Month Canada [IHMC}, launched in October 2007.) “We value and cherish our ethnic diversity,” said Melnick in a news release, “to which the Muslim community contributes so richly.” The substance of these contributions remains a mystery. (One recalls in this context the deplorably unfunny and overt propaganda sitcom, Little Mosque on the Prairie, which ran on national television from 2007 to 2012.) Since there are only 9000 Muslims in Manitoba, one may plausibly wonder why an entire month must be devoted to them. Interestingly, the Jewish population of Manitoba numbers 16,500 people and has contributed hugely over its 137 year presence to the cultural and economic vitality of the province — judges, philanthropists, publishers, teachers, writers, farmers — yet it has never been honored with a Jewish History Month. Neither has the approximately 60,000 strong Filipino community been ceremonially recognized.