Anti-pornography activists are using the Pentagon’s sex abuse scandal to pressure Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to ban all nudie mags from the military.

Their definition of pornography also extends to titles such as Cosmopolitan, Maxim, and FHM.

Morality in Media applauded Navy Secretary Ray Mabus’ order late last week that all workplaces be swept to ensure they’re “free from materials that create a degrading, hostile, or offensive work environment.”

Naval workplaces are defined as “office buildings, facilities, naval vessels, aircraft, government vehicles, hangars, ready rooms, conference rooms, individual offices, cubicles, storage rooms, tool and equipment rooms, workshops, break rooms, galleys, recreation areas, Navy and Marine Corps Exchanges, and heads,” as well as barracks common areas, schools and training facilities.

Material that will be in violation includes “degrading or offensive material includes, but is not limited to, documents, logs, books, pictures, photographs, calendars, posters, magazines, videos, props, displays, or other media, including electronic media, that contain inappropriate depictions and are detrimental to a professional working environment.”

Mabus said computers, desk drawers, individual barracks rooms, lockers, backpacks, cars, iPhones, etc., would be exempted from the offensive material inspection.

And today Morality in Media’s elation over Mabus’ memo was further tempered by a clarification from the Navy press office that Navy and Marine Exchanges would still continue to sell Playboy and other adult magazines.

“Throughout the military, Exchange stores are selling a large variety of pornographic magazines, which treat women as little more than whores whose self worth is tied to their ability to sexually excite. But isn’t that attitude at the root of the military’s shocking sexual abuse scandal?” the group said in a statement.

“We don’t suggest that pornography is the sole or even dominant cause of rising sexual assaults in the Military, but we know it won’t be solved until all women in the military are assured that the culture of sexual exploitation in the Armed Services is dead. That cannot happen unless Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel halts the sale of pornography in all Military Exchange.”

Internet porn is already blocked on Defense Department computer systems. Porn bans have also applied to certain theaters of conflict, such as 1990′s Desert Shield General Order #1 that was “intended to include not only ‘obscene items,’ but items of ‘art’ which display human genitalia, uncovered women’s breasts, or any human sexual act.” In Nov. 2009 the Army issued General Order #1 for personnel serving in Iraq and Kuwait that banned alcoholic beverages, entrance into mosques by non-Muslims, and any possession of sexually explicit images.

The Defense Department is on Morality in Media’s “Dirty Dozen List” as one of the top “facilitators of porn” in America.

Others on the list are Attorney General Eric Holder, Comcast, Facebook, Google Play, LodgeNet, Hilton Hotels, Twitter, the American Library Association, Wikipedia, Cosmopolitan magazine, and Barnes & Noble.

Holder tops the list because he “refuses to enforce existing federal obscenity laws against hardcore adult pornography.”

“The Pentagon has a serious pornography problem, and it is doing next to nothing to combat it. In fact, it seems to be embracing pornography,” the group says. “Morality In Media receives a steady stream of comments from servicemen and women and their spouses regarding the widespread availability of pornography in the US Military.”

Hagel hasn’t indicated how he would rule on this specific request, but he has indicated a willingness to try new suggestions to keep the solution to the number of sex abuses cases in the ranks out of the hands of Congress.