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Going Rogue Too Dumb for San Fran Bookstores. What Smart Books Made The Cut?

They won't carry Palin, but they will sell these.

by
David Steinberg

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November 20, 2009 - 9:58 am
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From yesterday’s San Francisco Chronicle — “Bay Area not maverick enough to read Palin book“:

It might as well have cooties. Hardly anyone wants to touch the thing, or even get close to it.

The new autobiography by moose hunter and failed vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin is harder to find in the Bay Area than a hockey mom. Some bookstores figure it’s one of those grit-your-teeth First Amendment deals that principled booksellers must put up with from time to time.

But many nonchain bookstores won’t handle it.

“Our customers are thinking people,” said Nathan Embretson, a bookseller at Pendragon Books in Oakland. “They’re not into reading drivel.”

Got it, Nathan.

Here’s a selection of some of the non-drively, thinky-type books Mr. Embretson carries at his store, per the Pendragon Books website:

Inside Job: Unmasking the 9-11 Conspiracies (Paperback)

By Jim Marrs

Inside Job is the definitive journalistic account of the hidden role of the Bush Whitehouse in perpetrating the 9/11 attacks. Veteran journalist Jim Marrs weaves into his coverage the kind of relentless undercover research that long ago established him as one of America’s leading conspiracy researchers. Originally written under contract for a large New York publisher, this book passed legal review and received extensive editorial support only to be cancelled suddenly in early 2003 with little explanation by the publisher.

Discovering America as It is (Paperback)

By Valdas Anelauskas

Analauskas is a self-described “white separatist”:

“Only from people of that peculiar tribe can we expect such Talmudic hatred for humanity. There is even a famous saying that wars are the Jews’ harvest.”

The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood (Paperback)

By … Rashid Khalidi.

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