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The Improbable Political Existence of Teddy Kennedy

His ability to survive scandals that brought down other politicians is hard to wrap one's head around.

by
Frank J. Fleming

Bio

August 28, 2009 - 12:40 am
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The only people being moronically partisan are those who didn’t condemn the man and didn’t stand aghast at the fact he was still in politics. What excuses are there for him? I’ve never heard anyone try to defend what he did; they just brush it off like time made the grossest irresponsible treatment of human life imaginable now a minor indiscretion.

Are mindless liberal politics really all you need to look past crimes like that? If you’re reading this and feeling outraged on Ted Kennedy’s behalf, you’re the one putting partisanship before basic decency.

People are praising all the great things he’s done, and it’s pure madness. Some are calling him a civil rights champion. What great things has he done? He was in the Senate basically his whole life. All he did was be rich, privileged, and talk his mouth off about whatever was the fashionable subject of the time. That’s something we should strive for? What sacrifice did he make for civil rights (I know of the human sacrifice he made — I’m talking about personal sacrifice)? Wouldn’t someone who understands civil rights not have failed so miserably on the subject of how you treat an individual human being in your own car?

Can you really understand civil rights in the abstract while not knowing how to treat actual people?

And what was his civil rights legacy? He was a rich white guy who killed a woman and got away without consequences, and so paved the way that one day a black man, O.J. Simpson, could do the same?

One I’ve heard from conservatives, struggling to be nice, is that he was someone who stood up for what he believed in. Well, obviously someone who commits manslaughter and still thinks he can run for president doesn’t care what other people say about him. He might have been so beyond normal humanity he didn’t even comprehend it.

Still, people liked the guy, Republicans and Democrats alike. Anyone who worked with him seemed to have nice things to say about him. But I don’t get all the praise about his accomplishments that seems to ignore what a grotesque blemish it was on our country that he was one of our democratically elected officials, and how completely insane it was that such an amoral wretch had any say whatsoever in the lives of other Americans. Is everyone inside the beltway really that out of touch that they don’t realize that to the average American, Ted Kennedy is rightfully nothing more than a punchline?

I feel bad saying this about someone after he died, but I keep taking a dispassionate look at the facts and don’t see how I am in any way overreacting. I just don’t get his existence at all. Still, I feel I should say at least something nice about him, as so many care for him, so I’ll use a technique I once saw on The Simpsons — saying the complete opposite of what I was planning to say.

Ted Kennedy was a wonderful person who had genuine concern for his fellow man. He was someone who started with little and built that up to accomplish great things. What I’ll remember most about him is his common decency, his humility, and how his head was quite normal-sized.

Edward M. Kennedy, rest in some fashion somewhere.

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Frank J. Fleming is the author of Punch Your Inner Hippie, coming November 11th, and the science fiction novel Superego, coming later this year, writes columns for PJ Media and the New York Post, and blogs at IMAO.us, and also wants little Barry to wear a hat so he doesn't catch a cold.
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