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Changes in Security Clearance System Coming After Navy Yard Shooting, Snowden

DNI looking into automated background checks and studying whether it can search social media websites for clues about potential risks.

by
Rodrigo Sermeño

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November 1, 2013 - 12:09 am
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WASHINGTON – Federal officials told a Senate panel they are revamping aspects of the nation’s security clearance system following the heavily criticized vetting of Edward Snowden and the Washington Navy Yard shooter.

The hearing Thursday before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs examined the adequacy of background checks and the security clearance system for federal employees and contractors.

It comes as officials investigate how Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old defense contractor and former Navy reservist, was able to acquire and maintain a secret clearance despite repeated brushes with the law, a series of angry outbursts, and concerns about his mental health. On Sept. 16, Alexis killed 12 people inside a Washington Navy Yard building where he worked before being fatally shot by police. He entered the property with a valid security badge.

Committee Chairman Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.) said he was concerned that a “troubled, unstable individual” could have received a security clearance.

“We must have a system that does a better job of rooting out those with nefarious purposes and those who become deeply troubled and unstable. That system must identify those whose behavior signals an unacceptable risk to be entrusted with classified information or access to sensitive federal facilities,” he said.

Brian Prioletti, an assistant director for the Special Security Directorate at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), said his agency is retooling parts of the nation’s security clearance system.

Under current policy, an individual’s continued eligibility depends on a periodic investigation that includes a background check and adjudication conducted every five or 10 years for a top-secret clearance or a secret clearance, respectively.

He said the intelligence community is considering making changes to the time between reinvestigations. This “continuous evaluation” process would allow ongoing reviews of an individual with access to classified information to ensure he or she still meets the requirements for eligibility.

Prioletti said his agency is also looking into automated background checks and studying whether it can search social media websites for clues about potential risks from workers with security clearances.

“A number of pilot studies have been initiated to assess the feasibility of select automated records checks and the utility of publicly available electronic information, to include social media sites, in the personnel security process,” he said.

Navy officials have said that when Alexis applied for a security clearance he lied about a 2004 arrest in Seattle for shooting the tires of an unoccupied vehicle, and he failed to disclose thousands of dollars in debts. An investigative report from an Office of Personnel Management (OPM) contractor omitted the fact that Alexis had fired shots, court records in Seattle did not specify the circumstances of the arrest, and no charges were filed.

Alexis was granted a clearance in 2008 and held onto it despite numerous subsequent encounters with police.

Elaine Kaplan, acting director of OPM, said Alexis’ background investigation examined state court records, but not the Seattle police reports because that department and others had not provided those documents in the past.

For secret level clearances, like the one Alexis had, there is an FBI check done, which reveals arrests, but does not reveal the disposition of cases that are handled at the state and local level.

“The FBI record revealed that Mr. Alexis had been charged and arrested for what was called ‘malicious mischief,’” Kaplan said. “The reason that a police report was not obtained was because…Seattle did not provide police reports. So what we were referred to by Seattle was the state database.”

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Top Rated Comments   
Not to mention the Bradley Manning case...If you read his personal background you see that this kid was really messed up psychologically. There was someone above him who decided, "Gosh let's make this information so that 18 year old Army privates can have access to it" and another, more immediate supervisor who ordered, "put THIS 18 year old private in charge of it. This weird, chip-on-his-shoulder discipline case..." Those superiors should be thanking their lucky stars that they aren't rotting in a cell next to Manning. I actually have more sympathy for a troubled 18 year old who does something incredibly stupid than I do for the person who so negligently allowed these documents to be so loosely guarded.
1 year ago
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All Comments   (7)
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my best friend's aunt makes $77 hourly on the internet. She has been without work for eight months but last month her check was $15175 just working on the internet for a few hours. ....>>>>>>>> http://xurl.es/g7gox
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
my best friend's sister makes $72 an hour on the laptop. She has been unemployed for ten months but last month her pay was $15093 just working on the laptop for a few hours. this post....WWW.Rush64.Com
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
These secret agencies have budget problems despite the gazillions they are allocated and do indeed spend. "Spend it or lose it".

Security Clearances, carefully and properly completed, are very expensive.

These agencies have cumbersome bureaucracies, perhaps too large for real efficiency.

So, lets cut personnel, cut "missions" and have a much, much smaller, more efficient intelligence community.

Eliminate the massive duplication.....doesn't each branch of the Armed Forces have its very own specialized security Division? Then there is.... [uh, oh] THE State Department....sadly, a category all to itself there in "Foggy Bottom".

O.K......all easier said than done.....but we've got to start somewhere, sometime.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
my neighbor's half-sister makes <$65> every hour on the laptop. She has been out of work for <10> months but last month her income was <$18909> just working on the laptop for a few hours. read review ___>>> www.BAy89.CoM
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Monitor social media? Well that would rule me out! ;-)

But seriously, if you are applying for a significant security clearance, certainly Top Secret, your life and surroundings should be carefully examined. Secret only requires a National Agency Check, a check for criminal records, basically. Confidential requires that you be drawing breath and not on fire. Maybe those need to be ratcheted up a notch, but the real problem is management of the information itself.

Why should a Bradley Manning or an Ed Snowdon should be able to download all that data without detection. Hell, why should the Chief of Staff of tye Army be able to download all that information? There is a principle in security called "Need to Know." Why they should be able to leave the building with any kind of recording media. I'm not sure why their computers should even accept recording devices, thumb drives or disks.

The level of security was shockingly lapse. Someone should literally hang for fitting that submarine with screen doors.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Not to mention the Bradley Manning case...If you read his personal background you see that this kid was really messed up psychologically. There was someone above him who decided, "Gosh let's make this information so that 18 year old Army privates can have access to it" and another, more immediate supervisor who ordered, "put THIS 18 year old private in charge of it. This weird, chip-on-his-shoulder discipline case..." Those superiors should be thanking their lucky stars that they aren't rotting in a cell next to Manning. I actually have more sympathy for a troubled 18 year old who does something incredibly stupid than I do for the person who so negligently allowed these documents to be so loosely guarded.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Yeah, Roger that, CristobalGordo. Manning's superiors should be rotting in those cells for gross dereliction. Pour encourager les autres.

1 year ago
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