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Boko Haram Condemnation Sweeps the Hill in Flash-Mob Fashion

Calls for rescuing the kidnapped schoolgirls include lawmakers heading to the Nigerian Embassy and one senator suggesting Special Forces action.

by
Bridget Johnson

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May 6, 2014 - 8:18 pm
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WASHINGTON — Congress switched into high gear Tuesday over the case of the missing Nigerian schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram, with one senator calling for the U.S. to send in Special Forces and all of the women in the upper chamber demanding that the UN list the terrorist group under al-Qaeda sanctions.

The flurry of condemnation coupled with calls for action was a 180-turnabout from the scant attention the al-Qaeda-allied group has traditionally received on the Hill, as demonstrated by a sparsely attended subcommittee hearing last fall on the Islamist organization’s reign of terror — including continual kidnappings of young girls.

The Congressional African Staff Association organized a moment of silence Tuesday afternoon on the east steps of the Capitol for the 234 girls kidnapped in a raid on their school in Chibok state on April 14.

Senate Chaplain Barry Black led staffers and lawmakers, a bipartisan group ranging from Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) to Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), in a prayer. Many wore red in solidarity with the families of the missing girls, and a Congolese musician performed in their honor.

Reps. Shelia Jackson Lee (D-Texas) and Karen Bass (D-Calif.) said they and other members of Congress would head to the Nigerian Embassy on Wednesday morning for a meeting with officials and a press conference. Jackson Lee said she sent a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry advocating that the department “exercise every means available to assist in the safe and speedy recovery of the missing girls, including enlisting the aid of the African Union.”

“Girls and young women around the world absolutely must be allowed to go to school peacefully and free from intimidation, persecution and all other forms of discrimination,” she added. “I call on whoever is responsible for abducting or continuing to hold these girls to release them immediately and unharmed. The abductors must ensure these young women return home safely, where they rightfully belong.”

On the Senate side, Sens. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Chris Coons (D-Del.) wrote directly to Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan. “We are appalled by this brutal and heinous act and reports that the girls may be trafficked to neighboring states and sold into child marriage,” the senators said. “We urge you to work expeditiously with international partners, including the United States, to determine what assistance is needed now to locate the missing women and bring their captors to justice.”

The Senate passed a resolution Tuesday introduced by Boxer, Coons, Durbin and Menendez, as well as Sens. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) and Mary Landrieu (D-La.), condemning the attack, urging the Obama administration to help in whatever way possible, and encouraging the Nigerian government to “strengthen efforts to protect the ability of children to obtain an education and to hold those who conduct such violent attacks accountable.”

The letter to Jonathan noted that, far from being intimated by the social media outcry over the Chibok kidnapping, Boko Haram abducted eight more girls in the Warabe village of Borno state. “The Nigerian people, especially its children, have a right to live and learn peacefully in their own land,” the senators wrote. “Moving forward, it is vital that your government engage with international partners to address the root causes of unrest in your nation and the escalating threat to peace, stability, and long-term development goals in Nigeria.”

And all 20 women in the Senate, led by Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.), sent a letter to President Obama calling for international sanctions against Boko Haram, which was founded in 2002 and was conducting terror operations for years before being designated a foreign terrorist organization by the U.S. last November.

“The girls were targeted by Boko Haram simply because they wanted to go to school and pursue knowledge, and we believe the United States must respond quickly and definitively,” the Senate women wrote. “In the face of the brazen nature of this horrific attack, the international community must impose further sanctions on this terrorist organization. Boko Haram is a threat to innocent civilians in Nigeria, to regional security, and to U.S. national interests.”

“While we applaud the initial U.S. condemnation of the kidnapping, we believe there is much more that the United States government should do to make clear that such an attack will not be tolerated. We urge you to press for the addition of Boko Haram and Ansaru to the United Nations Security Council’s al-Qa’ida Sanctions List, the mechanism by which international sanctions are imposed on al-Qa’ida and al-Qa’ida-linked organizations,” the letter continues. “Their addition to the List would compel a greater number of countries to sanction Boko Haram, joining several countries, including the United States, which have already done so. ”

Furthermore, Collins told CNN that the U.S. should send in military assistance.

Top Rated Comments   
When is the OIC, CAIR the ISNA or some other group going to complain?

After it is all water under the bridge? Boko Haram has been active for over 3 years now doing this crap and the OIC has been sitting on the sidelines mute or maybe approving.

We do not need a great number of troops on the ground. We just need to back up the Nigerian military to the hilt and put some special operators on the ground.

We should also make this war personnel (Not going after every last solider). We need to go after the leaders so they can't brainwash and send young men to kill and rape at their command.

We every last evil leader gets waxed, no one will want to replace them.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
To me it's no coincidence that this outcry has been powered by our old friends with a one-sided and very peculiar notion of social justice: intersectional QUILTBAG feminists.

Ironically, it's feminist meddling in places they claim women SHOULD be able to do things as opposed to whether they CAN do those things that is putting these girls in harm's way.

When Lee writes “Girls and young women around the world absolutely must be allowed to go to school peacefully and free from intimidation, persecution and all other forms of discrimination,” she is utterly clueless.

Like Cate Blanchett said in "Elizabeth," "must" is a word one doesn't use around princes, and in Afghanistan, Syria, Egypt, Nigeria and Uganda, a man's home is still his castle. Unless Lee is going to stand outside classrooms with an automatic weapon, she might want to rethink feminist doctrine that says "should" be able to do a thing is the same thing as "is it advisable?" Their ignorant "sl*t walks" that maintain one should be safe naked in an alley at 3 A.M. while drunk is great. Yes, one SHOULD be safe - but one ISN'T.

Black feminists think their color and sex give them insights into global situations they don't come close to understanding. It's part of their false notion there is such a thing as PoC, a person of color, that connects Guatemalan schoolgirls and Sikh taxi drivers compared to white people in a fantasy world that literally does not exist.

It's symbolic of feminism that they tried to shame men into action on Twitter rather than taking direct action themselves. Where are the amazon brigades of tough and gritty women feminists want to see on film and in books to go and pluck those girls out of danger?

Don't worry - we'll take care of it. But we won't be keeping an eye out for skin and gender when we decide to do a thing or not to do a thing.

Go ahead and encourage people to do things in Third World countries from the safety of your tenured position or blog in the West. When you've convinced enough gays you have their back so they have a rally in Tahrir Square, where are you when they're all arrested?

Next time a female writer who is ex-military expresses concern over the 9/11 mosque, rather than strip her of her Guest of Honor status and disinvite her from a feminist literary convention on charges of Islamophobia, you may want to think about this thing called "reality."

The reason Nigerians are enacting anti-homosexual laws is because weirdos who talk to their v*ginas like Eve Ensler and V-day are going there and sticking their noses where they don't belong, doing more harm than good for people they cannot in reality protect. Ensler gets to go home, easy for her to fly in - slum - and fly out.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Nothing like a break from Benghazi Benghazi Benghazi eh Nancy?

11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (41)
All Comments   (41)
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-and when calmer heads prevail and the Republicans refuse to support the sending of special forces to rescue a handful of admittedly poor unfortunate girls in a world swarming with Islamic atrocities ignored, your War on Women meme gets a huge shot of meth straight into the mainline.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Who gave the moon god worshipers the AK's and armored personnel carrier? Plus, there is no way that African in the video is in charge of the terror gang.

He's got no rhythm!

It's strange, Ukraine is heating up then BAM!, a brush fire in northern Nigeria w/250 girls kidnaped. Let's follow the money and I was told most of Ukraine wants to be Russian.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Do the Senate ladies object to any movement which denies females the chance to go to school?

Or just the ones that are trending on Twitter?
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Nothing like hypocrisy in the Democrat Party. They pretend to be feminists, while actually lining up with the reactionary Left that is primitivist and devoted to cultural relativism and "autheniticity." See http://clarespark.com/2014/05/03/elie-kedouries-nationalism-am-i-stumped/, retitled "The Good Old Days."
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
I wonder what religious Boko Haram is affiliated with? Not one lawmaker mentioned this in their statements. Gee, I'm stumped.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
"The Congressional African Staff Association organized a moment of silence Tuesday afternoon on the east steps of the Capitol for the 234 girls kidnapped in a raid on their school in Chibok state on April 14.

Senate Chaplain Barry Black led staffers and lawmakers, a bipartisan group ranging from Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) to Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), in a prayer. Many wore red in solidarity with the families of the missing girls, and a Congolese musician performed in their honor."

Matt 6:5) And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
6) But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.
7) But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
While public prayer is not universally condemned by this scripture, it is a pretty safe bet that the public prayer you referenced falls under the umbrella of verse 5.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
It is election year. Democrats don't really want to get involved in a war and since our war on terror is over how can they can this group terrorist. So to look like they are upholding the standard of women and children they can safely spout slogans without much US intervention since after 3 weeks the children have already been sold. Such a peace loving religion Islam is.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
How inane of democrats to accuse republicans of waging war on women while ignoring if not silencing the reality that Shira Islamists are a threat to women and humanity throughout the world.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s foundation teaches educators and law enforcement how to recognize signs of ‘honor violence’ in U.S. immigrant communities. She appears in the movie Honor Diaries that explores the brutality and inequality women face in the Muslim world.
Shame on Brandeis University for disinviting this intelligent, brave survivor.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
So, has the king of Saudi Arabia, or at least the Saudi embassy condemned this act?
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, they said motorcycles are tacky and that Sharia-approved all-terrain four-wheel drive pick-up trucks are much better for slavery considering the geography.
11 weeks ago
11 weeks ago Link To Comment
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