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Goons of Iran

Friday, May 25th, 2007 - by Ardeshir Arian


Iran's Crackdown on "Children of Allah Influenced by International Imperialism" Continues -- 3,000 Arrested, 1,200 Automobiles Confiscated, 1,000 Shops Closed, 75,000 Warnings Issued By Ardeshir Arian, PJM Special Correspondent

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Rest in Peace: Tashbih Sayyed

Thursday, May 24th, 2007

tashbih_sayyed%2C.jpgTashbih Sayyed – one of the great fighters for moderate Islam – has passed away. He was a personal friend to some of us at PJ Media and we extend our condolences to his family. Some of Tashbih’s writings can be found here and here.

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BWIR: The Reunion

Thursday, May 24th, 2007

Longtime panelists Glenn Reynolds and Tammy Bruce are back in the Blog Week in Review; they join host Austin Bay to evaluate the new Democratic majority in Congress. Are they delivering on their promise to "end the culture of corruption? They also discuss the new winds in Europe, where Tony Blair is stepping down and new France president Nicolas Sarkozy is joining Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel in a much less antagonistic position towards the US than their predecessors. Produced by Ed Driscoll. Brought to you by Volvo USA.

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Old Europe Works

Thursday, May 24th, 2007 - by Max B. Sawicky


bear.jpg"Call me crazy, but I find the obsession with Gross Domestic Product in economic commentary to be odd, not to say perverse." By Max B. Sawicky

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Surrender Another Day

Thursday, May 24th, 2007 - by Jules Crittenden

Iran wants a Tet. So do the Democrats. They both need it to accomplish their shared goal -- the United States out of Iraq, in the most chaotic and shameful way possible. By Jules Crittenden

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"Body farms are springing up all over…"

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

It appears that Texas residents a href=”http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1623538,00.html”are upset about the prospect of a body farm /apopping up in their backyards (Hat tip: Michael W.):br /br /blockquoteThe CSI TV shows are among the most watched in the world. But forensic science is hitting a little close to home for some Texas property owners, who oppose plans for a nearby “body farm,” where decomposing bodies will be studied in the wild. br /br /In this real-life episode of emCSI/em: Nimby— not in my backyard — residents of a rural area near the San Marcos Airport, 30 miles south of Austin, have objected to plans by Texas State University to build a 17-acre body farm nearby. With three acres designated for research and surrounded by a wide fenced boundary, plus cages over the exposed bodies, university officials assured residents there would no problems….br /br /The first facility at the University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Facility, was opened on a three-acre site in Knoxville in 1971 by noted anthropologist William Bass. Prolific crime writer Patricia Cornwell popularly dubbed it a “body farm” in her novel of the same name. Bass himself has co-written a series of best-selling novels set on the farm; the first, a href=”http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060759828?ie=UTF8tag=wwwviolentkicomlinkCode=as2camp=1789creative=9325creativeASIN=0060759828″emCarved in Bone/em,/aimg src=”http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwviolentkicoml=as2o=1a=0060759828″ width=”1″ height=”1″ border=”0″ alt=”" style=”border:none !important; margin:0px !important;” / was described as “southern-fried forensics” by Kirkus Reviews….br /br /Jason Byrd, a well-known forensic entomologist, says that body farms are becoming more important as stranger-on-stranger crime is on the increase. In cases where the victim is related to the murderer by family, financial or social bonds, police often use these connections to help solve cases. “Now there are more random acts of violence and we have less and less avenues to turn to,” says Byrd. Body farms cannot be set up to mimic every kind of environment, of course, but already they have given southern criminologists vital research — for example, bodies decompose in Florida in three days, compared with 30 days in the mountains of Tennessee. /blockquotebr /br /I find it troubling that body farms are “springing up all over” as a result of stranger-on-stranger crime becoming more prevalent. “Current statistics show that a href=”http://www.emergency.com/chgomrdr.htm”only 45 percent of murder victims actually knew /atheir killers. During the 1960′s, 71 percent of murder victims knew who their killers were.” Perhaps this increase in stranger killings is why people feel more fearful of being the victim of a random violent act now more than ever before and why shows like emCSI/em are so popular. It is harder to find an unknown killer and advanced forensics can make the difference in whether or not the killer is caught. So CSI may act as a therapeutic measure for some people albeit a false one since many times, CSI has advanced techniques that the police and experts are not equipped to carry out. br /br /We recently interviewed Bill Bass–the forensic anthropologist for a a href=”http://drhelen.blogspot.com/2007/01/podcast-on-forensic-science.html”podcast that you can check out here /aif you want to know more about forensic anthropology and the work being done at the Body Farm.

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Sanity Squad: Leaders Great and Otherwise

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

The public figure that is simultaneously a leader is a dying breed. With elected officials who display a spine being so few and far between, the Squad talks about the nature of good leadership, taking responsibility for one's actions in the era of the rote public apology, and whether or not leadership itself has gotten a bad rap.

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Iran — Going…. Going…. :

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

Lies, gas prices, beatings, repression, goods unavailable… Michael Ledeen takes a look at recent events in Mullah Land and concludes, “Iran fulfills every requirement of a ‘pre-revolutionary situation.’ Yet our leaders will not support that revolution.” See if you agree at Faster, Please!

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First Blogger?

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007


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Since the '04 Howard Dean campaign, the Internet has been seen as fertile ground for presidential candidates. But the advent of a possible candidacy by former Senator Fred Thompson could take online politics to a new level. In this exclusive article for PJ Media, Thompson reveals a respect for the 'net and its importance to democracy that could only come from a true web surfer. If the six-time weekly winner of the PJM Presidential Straw Poll is actually elected President, are we looking at ... the First Blogger? To PJM and Friends By Fred Thompson So, I hear you all have been talking about me.

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Is Drinking at a Prom Party Really News-Worthy?

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

a href=”http://blogs.knoxnews.com/knx/editor/2007/05/was_prom_party_news.shtml”The editor of the emKnoxville News-Sentinel/em, /aour local news paper, is getting constructive feedback from blog commenters on a ridiculous article that was given prominent coverage entitled, a href=”http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/local_news/article/0,1406,KNS_347_5533464,00.html”"When little prom party blew up.” /aThe article was about a prom party that got “out of hand” with (gasp) drinking at a private residence:br /br /blockquoteA West Knox County businessman, whose karate training touts building character in children, and his wife face charges they provided beer and liquor to 20 underage people at their daughter’s after-prom party.br /br /Jack and Katharine Butturini were charged May 6 with contributing to the delinquency of a minor after authorities broke up a party at the couple’s waterfront Loudon County home.br / br /”It was one of the largest parties I’ve ever seen,” said Loudon County Sheriff’s Office Deputy T.J. Scarbrough.br /br /Court records show deputies cited seven people under the age of 18 on charges of underage consumption. The identities of the juveniles scheduled to appear May 22 in Loudon County Juvenile Court are not public record.br /br /Deputies cited 13 others between 18 and the legal age of 21 to Loudon County General Sessions Court. When they appear May 23 in court, they also will be fingerprinted and photographed, Loudon County Sheriff Tim Guider said./blockquote br /br /Tam, a gunblogger in Knoxville,a href=”http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot.com/2007/05/all-news-thatshuh.html” poked a bit of fun on her blog/a at the editor of the News-Sentinel for running the story:br /br /blockquoteStanding in the checkout line at the grocery store last Saturday, I glanced down at the Knoxville News Sentinel in the rack by the register and was struck dumb. There at the top of the front page, above the fold, in the place usually reserved for things like War Was Declared!, Man Lands On Moon!, or Dewey Defeats Truman!, was something very much along the lines of Drunken Teen Prom Party In Suburbia. As news, this has to rate up there with Sun Rises In East. Yet somehow this shindig, and the criminal charges surrounding it, have been all over the local paper for the better part of the week.br /br /I’m trying to figure out why this deserves so much ink. Maybe the accused suburbanite, Mr. Butturini, beat up the newspaper editor in the third grade or something./blockquotebr /br /I have to agree with Tam who a href=”http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot.com/2007/05/blog-stuff-further-rumination-on-party.html”goes on to say this about /athis little shindig:br /br /blockquotePart of the thing that made me a bit incredulous at the whole Prom Party Shenanigans Scandal was the fact that there were criminal charges at all. I was unaware that it was against the law to allow a minor to drink at a private residence. Does this mean that if you allow your kid to have a glass of wine with dinner on special occasions, you’re a bona fide criminal? Unreal (and also uncool.)/blockquotebr /br /Very uncool, and BTW Tam, I highly doubt that Jack Butturini beat up the newspaper editor in the third grade. I went to school with Jack and he was as kind-hearted and as honest as they come. I never saw him hurt anyone or say a cross word–my guess is that his version of the story is the correct one and the Sherriff’s office overstepped their bounds with him, at least, in my opinion.

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Are PHD’s and MD’s Worth the Sacrifice?

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007

I have read a a href=”http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/04/22/ncareer22.xml”number of articles /a lately about the falling birth rate among educated women in the United States and Europe; many of these lower rates are blamed on sexual diseases, later age of marriage and women waiting too long to have kids. It’s great that women are so into their careers but some of these careers take a lifetime to prepare for. I wish someone had told me years ago at 18 that I would be spending another 14 years in school training to be a psychologist. I even made it through undergrad in three years but little did I know that it would be years of work before I finished two masters, a postmasters, a PHD and a post-doc–11 more to be exact. I have almost no regrets about my life, save for one, that I spent my youth in graduate school when it was unnecessary, unfullfilling and not very lucrative. br /br /Lest you think I am just an anomaly who doddered through school, I read recently that the average PHD in psychology takes over 7 years to complete after a BA and many schools have their students take even longer. For example, at the University of Pennsylvania, a a href=”http://espse.ed.psu.edu/schoolpsych/51″PHD in School Psych /atakes a median average of 7.75 years emafter/em a master’s degree. If you go directly in with a BA, it will take a median average of 8.75 years. And then there is the one year Post-doc that many states require in order to get licensed and the licensing exams themselves (usually written and oral). By this time, a woman is often close to thirty or more–meaning that if she wants kids, there is not much time. I knew several colleagues who had families and kids during one of my PHD programs and some of them dropped out or their marriage ended. I imagine that medical school and other PHD programs also pose hardships on women who want to have children but of course, it is doable.br /br /This post is not to discourage women or men for that matter from going to time-consuming graduate programs, it is simply to remind people that in life there are trade-offs and it is important to remember that while a PHD or MD is quite an accomplishment, it can also be quite a hindrance. Only the person getting the degree can decide if it is worth the sacrifice.

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Show of Force?

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2007 - by Ardeshir Arian

The Iranian regime's crackdown against 'indecency' is getting more unpopular by the day. By Ardeshir Arian, PJM Special Correspondent

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Cut America Some Slack

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2007

“What, then, is the radical Left good for? Mostly psychological cover. It is our version of the Athenian elite demagogue’s dung on his boots or Medieval indulgences or the Bible in the hand of the philandering fundamentalist. Its rhetoric alone allows Edwards to enjoy his mansion, Gore his jet, the Kennedys’ their drink and drugs, Bill Clinton his sex, and Soros his billions-and China its cutthroat acquisitions abroad and its suppression at home.”

by Victor Davis Hanson

Read the rest HERE.

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Where are the Interest Groups for Boys?

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2007

Blogger Bob Krumm a href=”http://www.bobkrumm.com/blog/2007/05/21/the-smallest-minority/”went to a recent high school graduation /aand noticed that men (boys) were in short supply (Hat tip: a href=”http://instapundit.com/archives2/005484.php”Instapundit/a). He noted that most of the academic honors also went to the women (girls). The possible reason for the lack of success for the boys? No special interest groups:br /br /blockquoteMuch like our misguided welfare systems still focuses on the prevention of starvation when it is obesity that is the greater nutritional problem associated with poverty, our gender-based education programs now target the wrong sex for academic improvement. That puts boys at an even greater disadvantage since, unlike as for girls, there aren’t well-organized and powerful “male special interest groups” that will fight to give boys the boost they need. /blockquotebr /br /I used to think that special interest groups were silly and a waste of time–thinking they emphasized victimhood at the expense of autonomy, but I am beginning to think I was wrong. Perhaps boys need a special interest group to stand behind them and see that their needs are presented equally. Because so far, the lack of one doesn’t seem to be doing boys any good in regards to education.br /br /Update: There is a special interest group called The Boys Project that advocates for legislative change and education to benefit boys. You can see a href=”http://www.boysproject.net/issues.html”more about the project here. /a

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Mind-Altering Worldviews

Monday, May 21st, 2007 - by Pastor Bruce Moon

"We are fast approaching the point where either we must reject the pterodactyl-like hallucinations of irrational humanistic constructs that only produce mind-boggling complacent stupor, political correctness contrivances, and cowardice, or we will become a pitiful specter of our former selves through our utter stupidity." by Pastor Bruce Moon

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Interview with Kevin Pho, MD

Monday, May 21st, 2007

There are few of us who are health service providers who are able to put our names and faces on our blogs, but Dr. Kevin Pho is one such physician and blogger who does so. a href=”http://edrugsearch.com/edsblog/five-questions-with-kevin-md/”Cary Byrd at eDrugSearch.com /ainterviewed Dr. Pho and I found it very interesting–particularly the part about medical docs who are being run out of blogging:br /br /blockquoteDr. Kevin Pho is a hero to health and medical bloggers everywhere, because his blog, Kevin, M.D., has done so much to increase interest in our little corner of the blogosphere. Kevin offers a candid view of problems in the U.S. healthcare system from a doctor’s perspective — and unlike many medical bloggers who are rightly fearful of employer reprimand or legal reprisals, he is able to put his name and face by his opinions./blockquotebr /br /Go by and a href=”http://edrugsearch.com/edsblog/five-questions-with-kevin-md/”check out the interview/a and also take a look at the linksa href=”http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2007/05/black-wednesday-dark-day-for-medical.html” such as this one /athat takes a look at the perils of blogging while a medical professional.br /br /Update: And on a related note, a href=”http://impactednurse.com/?p=319″Grand Rounds is up./a

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Rose/Warraq Win Freedom Prizes

Monday, May 21st, 2007

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Flemming Rose and Leon de Winter
in the Reagan Library’s “Oval Office” – photo: Roger L. Simon
Flemming Rose – cultural editor of the newspaper Jyllands-Posten and the man responsible for the publication of the Danish cartoons – and the pseudonymous Ibn Warraq – most literally “son of a papermaker,” author of Why I Am Not a Muslim, among other works – were awarded Heroes of Conscience medals by the American Freedom Alliance at a dinner at the Reagan Library Sunday night. The AFA will be be sponsoring a conference – The Collapse of Europe? – starting June 10 at Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA. Speakers include Mark Steyn, Aayan Hirsi Ali and Leon de Winter.

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"I miss Lakeshore, I miss Lakeshore…"

Monday, May 21st, 2007

a href=”http://www.metropulse.com/articles/2007/17_20/coverstory.html”There is a good article /a this week in the emMetro Pulse/em, our weekly alternative newspaper here in Knoxville, on the plight of the homeless, 55 % of whom are mentally ill. The story discusses Lakeshore Mental Health Institute, a facility that has downsized from 2400 beds in 1970 to about 180 beds today. I had to laugh recently when I saw some administrator in a news interview talking aboutem all /emof the beds available here for the mentally ill in Knoxville after the Virginia Tech massacre. 180 beds? That’s nothing. What happened to the patients who were taking up the other 2220 beds in 1970? Did they all get better? No, in 2007, they and probably their descendents are being humanely discharged to the streets. br /br /Some of them end up at the Volunteer Ministry Center (VMC) here where they at least get shelter for the night but according to the executive director, Jenny Weatherstone, at VMC, the mentally ill need an atmosphere that is fairly structured and calm. “And that does not describe any shelter, including ours, nor does it describe life on the streets, yet that’s where so many people end up.” “Weatherstone remembers one lady who came into VMC. She sat in the waiting room, pulled her legs up to her chest, and gently rocked herself in the fetal position. She chanted as if it were a mantra, ‘I miss Lakeshore, I miss Lakeshore, I miss Lakeshore….’ Over and over and over.” br /br /So many civil libertarians want to believe that it is a good thing that patients were “humanely” dumped out of the mental hospitals to live “free” in the society. But I bet if you asked the woman above chanting her mantra, she might feel differently. I remember Lakeshore in the 1980′s when there were more beds than now; I volunteered several days a week on a woman’s ward after college and watched the medical personnel care for the patients with medical care, occupational therapy, exercise and nutritional meals. One woman I met there had lived most of her life in Lakeshore and felt that the facility was her home. I can’t see how the streets are better.br /br /The city of Knoxville now owns 60 acres of Lakeshore’s 300-acre farm, it is a public park with beautiful rock gardens and a walking trail. I always feel slightly gypped when I walk on the grounds there and notice that some of the buildings are sitting empty and others have been torn down. I think of all the patients I have seen over the course of my career that needed inpatient services that couldn’t get them or got them for too short of a time to be of any use, and I realize that deep down, I miss Lakeshore too.

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Al-Qaeda Plays the Spanish Card in France

Monday, May 21st, 2007 - by Richard Miniter

An al-Qaeda cell has threatened to wage Jihad against France for voting the "wrong way." The cell has a familiar name, connected with groups in Iraq and also with those who perpetrated the Madrid and London bombings. Is the threat real, or a part of a disinformation campaign? By Richard Miniter, PJM Washington editor

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Right Turn Republicans

Monday, May 21st, 2007

Bill Bradley wonders why California Republicans are insisting on falling on their already short sword, “The party has replaced Duf Sundheim, its moderately conservative Silicon Valley lawyer chairman and key Arnold ally with the very conservative Ron Nehring, a longtime employee and associate of controversial Washington right-wing fixture Grover Norquist, who runs a national anti-tax crusade and is a longtime associate of the neoconservative adventurers who brought you the Iraq War.” Read the rest HERE @ PAJAMASXPRESS.

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Killing Kennedy Revisted Again Encore Redux

Monday, May 21st, 2007

Ron Rosenbaum is live-blogging his reading of two books on the Kennedy assassination, “The Warren Commission in other words had failed to solve the problem of motive. The report was weakest in sorting out Oswald’s actual political allegiances and personal psychology. So I’ve come to think that Oswald was the only one who fired shots that day but that a real and significant aspect of the case remains unsolved.” Read the rest HERE @ PAJAMASXPRESS.

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The Hollow Men

Monday, May 21st, 2007


Victor Hanson discerns the danger of “the smiley international corporation…. with the face of Birkenstocks, polo shirts, and an I-pod, run by the man who believes in no affiliation other than as an alumnus donor to his business school… who is pledged to nothing other than the notion of profit and the dangers to globalized profit that are posed by those who stand for ideas and values which get in the way of Kumbaya hedge funds and tranbordered consortia.” Read the rest of “Not With a Bang” HERE @ PAJAMASXPRESS.

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Baghdad Report: An Update on the Security Situation

Monday, May 21st, 2007 - by Omar Fadhil


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Violence is down in Baghdad just as it seems to be increasing in other strategic areas of Iraq. A sign that al-Qaeda is on the move, writes Omar Fadhil. By Omar Fadhil, PJM Baghdad editor

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18th Week in progress – Thompson, Richardson continue to ride high in 17th Week – Vote once a week – Get a Widget for you site

Sunday, May 20th, 2007

Over 115,000 votes have been cast in the weekly PAJAMAS MEDIA PRESIDENTIAL STRAW POLL. The eighteenth week has officially begun. DON'T FORGET: You can put the poll on your website or blog with our free voting widget and become a precinct in the PJ Media Straw Poll. Learn how the readers of your site are voting and compare it the the total.

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The Power of Touch

Sunday, May 20th, 2007

The other day I went to get a massage and the regular female massage therapist I usually saw was out; I was presented with a male therapist which was fine. I have no qualms about the sex of the massage therapist as long as they are good. However, I did notice that although the massage was technically very good, it just did not feel “right” to me. Afterwards, I tried to think about what it was that bothered me and hoped that I was not some type of sexist who just didn’t want a male therapist. But that wasn’t it. I realized that it has more to do with the body type of the person and the kinesthetic feel of their hands and touch. br /br /It reminded me of a guy I went out with in my twenties who just didn’t feel right. He was really nice looking and a great guy, but he was very wiry and thin–and he just “felt” wrong to me. I talked to one of my male friends about the experience and told him that on paper, the guy was terrific, and there was chemistry, I liked him but his touch was just somehow wrong. My friend was involved with a woman who also should have been perfect for him but the first words out of his mouth as he listened to me was “She doesn’t feel right. She should but she doesn’t.” br /br /I wonder how important touch is in keeping people together–I am not necessarily talking about sex, for you can have great sex without great touch. I mean, the kinesthetic quality of someone’s hands when they touch you or wrap your hand in theirs. I think that perhaps for each of us, there are certain body types and ways of touching that feel right to us and others that just don’t. It would be interesting to do an experiment where couples were asked to honestly appraise their first experience holding hands and how they felt. I wonder if the divorce rate would be lower among those who felt that the experience was like coming home versus those who remember the experience as unremarkable. br /br /What amazes me most, though, is that people will ignore this very primitive but useful information when deciding who to live with, or even who to marry. For when hard times come during a relationship, and they usually do, falling back on the kinesthetic qualities that brought you together in the first place is a good place to be.

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