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Pajamas HEARTS Hot Air

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

hotair.gifPJ Media is exceptionally pleased to announce that Michelle Malkin’s groundbreaking multimedia blog HOT AIR has joined the PJ Media Network. HOT AIR has been one of the true pioneers of original opinion video on the internet. Ms. Malkin’s first blog – Michelle Malkin – has been part of the Pajamas network since its inception.

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Iran Student Demonstrations Continue

Thursday, May 31st, 2007 - by Ardeshir Arian


Largely ignored by our mainstream media, student demonstrations are continuing in Iran, protesting the often-violent presence of the pro-Islamic Regime Basij paramilitary forces on campus. This demonstration, with extraordinarily brave and moving speeches against the mullahs by students at Tehran's Polytechnic University (Amir Kabir), took place on May 28, 2007. Click HERE for an exclusive translation by Ardeshir Arian for PJ Media.

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Baq from Iraq – Part 3

Thursday, May 31st, 2007

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In his continuing series from his recent visit to Iraq, PJM's Richard Miniter takes us inside his reporter's notebook for Scenes from a War. Earlier reports here and here.

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Bread & Butter

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

PJM's Paris editor is traveling the USA, reporting on the new Sarkozy mood in France, and claiming there is no real bread and butter to be found in the States. Well, nobody can be right 100% of the time....

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Crittenden Puts on His Pajamas

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

Pajamas.gifPJ Media is pleased to announce that Jules Crittenden’s Forward Movement blog has joined the Pajamas network. Mr. Crittenden is a city editor of the Boston Herald and a frequent contributor to this site. Some of his recent articles for PJM are here and here.

UPDATE: Crittenden explains his sartorial choice.

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Chavenezuela

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007 - by Fausta Wertz

How the Man Who Would Be Castro marked a new milestone on the path towards totalitarianism by shutting down the nation's most popular television station. He will keep at it until there is no free press left and no one to report the fact that it disappeared. By Fausta Wertz

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Is Your Job Killing You?

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

I think mine was. Yesterday, I saw my a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiac_electrophysiology”electrophysiologist/a for my bi-annual interrogation of a href=”http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=11227″my ICD /aand he noticed that my irregular heartbeats had lessened. He asked me about my job and I told him that I had cut the stress of the job over the past few years by reducing the number of patients I see substantially and in addition, not taking on any more cases of those who are violent or potentially violent at the current time. He nodded and said, “it shows, because those heart palpitations have lessened–decreased stress could be the reason.” br /br /Now, as a psychologist, you would think that I would know a href=”http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0451171136?ie=UTF8tag=wwwviolentkicomlinkCode=as2camp=1789creative=9325creativeASIN=0451171136″that there is some link between stress and heart problems/aimg src=”http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wwwviolentkicoml=as2o=1a=0451171136″ width=”1″ height=”1″ border=”0″ alt=”" style=”border:none !important; margin:0px !important;” / and I do intellectually, but emotionally, it finally sank in that perhaps my job and the subsequent stress of dealing over a number of years with patients with severe mental illness and anger issues might have contributed to my heart attack, or at least to the subsequenta href=”http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=64″ ventricular tachycardia /a that followed as a result of my messed-up heart. br /br /I should have known something was wrong when I once did a research project during grad school in 1990 on the effect of my behavior on subsequent patient behavior and vice versa. I found that when doing evaluations with highly agitated patients, I emfelt/em highly angry and stressed (but did not show it, I hope). “Oh, what an interesting chart,” I thought when I turned it into the professor (with all clients coded with numbers and data changed for confidentiality purposes, of course). I should have seen that chart as a red flag and warning sign that I was perhaps not good at dealing with stress, but at the time, I was just glad to turn in the project and go onto something else. br /br /I didn’t realize how much I internalized the stress of my job until I had enough perspective and real physical data in the decreased irregular heartbeats to see what was going on internally by taking on such serious cases. I wish that I was heartier and more immune to stress, but I have to accept that in certain areas, I am not. My life’s work has been compromised, but I suppose that is what being a realist is about–understanding that although one can have a love and a propensity towards a certain kind of work, that one’s body can often dictate what one is able to do. I only wish I had realized it earlier but I guess late is better than never. br /br /Anyone else out there think their job may be contributing to a shorter life span and if so, what do you plan to do about it?

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Women "Innocent" if They Kill their Own Children?

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

This week, a 25-year-old mother from Texas a href=”http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/29/children.killed.ap/index.html”hung herself and her four children,/a one of them survived:br /br /blockquoteA young mother who may have been depressed apparently hanged three of her small daughters and herself in a closet using pieces of clothing and sashes, authorities said Tuesday.br /br /A fourth child, an 8-month-old daughter, was also found dangling in the closet but was rescued from the family’s mobile home./blockquotebr /br /The article a href=”http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/29/children.killed.ap/index.html”ends up with some /aobservations about four other Texas women who had killed their children. All four of those women were found “innocent” by reason of insanity.br /br /Compare these cases of women who kill their emown/em kids a href=”http://news.aol.com/topnews/articles/_a/texas-babysitter-faces-execution/20070527213909990001″with a recent one for a Texas babysitter /awho is to be executed next month: br /br /blockquoteBut just weeks after Henderson started working for the Baughs, 3-month-old Brandon was dead and Henderson had fled the state. The infant’s body was found buried 60 miles away with his skull crushed, wrapped in his yellow-trimmed white blanket and stuffed into a box that previously held Bartles Jaymes wine coolers. br /br /Henderson, 50, is set to die in less than three weeks for the 1994 slaying that made her one of the most hated women in Texas. She would be just the 12th woman among the nearly 1,100 convicted killers executed since capital punishment resumed in the United States in 1977….br /br /Henderson insists Brandon died in an accidental fall and that her decision to bury him and flee was made in panic, not in cold blood./blockquote br /br /My question, why the “lighter” sentences for killing one’s own kids vs. killing another woman’s? Is it because children are seen as women’s property so it is “okay” to kill one’s own but not another woman’s? If so, isn’t this a little sick? br /br /Also note how few women are actually executed at all. They make up 10-15% of homicide offenders but only 1% of executions have been women.

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Baq from Iraq – Part 2

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007


In his second report from his recent trip to Iraq, PJ Media Washington Editor Richard Miniter explains "Why Is Northern Iraq Safe?" ... Richard's first report is here.

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Fisking the IHT

Tuesday, May 29th, 2007

intl_herald_tribune_logo.jpgVictor Hanson, during a tour of Greece, takes a moment to eviscerate one day’s worth of the International Herald Tribune (AKA: “The New York Times Global edition.”) Among the IHT’s stories that draw his attention is, “A surreal human interest about a Muslim conference to end the negative Western image of Islam in the West (with no mention of suicide vests, IEDs, lunacy on the West Bank, in Iran, or Iraq, Sharia Law, polygamy etc.)” Read the rest at Victor Hanson’s Works & Days in PajamasXpress.

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Memorial Day Grand Rounds

Tuesday, May 29th, 2007

Medical Grand Rounds a href=”http://frommedskool.com/2007/05/29/memorial-day-grand-rounds/”is up in celebration /aof Memorial Day at frommedskool.com.br /br /Update: Also up:a href=”http://homeschooling.about.com/b/a/216454.htm” Carnival of Homeschooling: Alaska./a

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The New Hostage Crisis

Tuesday, May 29th, 2007 - by Ardeshir Arian


For the first time in 27 years, US diplomats met Monday with representatives of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Iranian-American filmmaker Ardeshir Arian analyzes for PJ Media the reasons that the Iranians are talking - and why we shouldn't fall into their trap. By Ardeshir Arian

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The Missing Link?

Monday, May 28th, 2007

Iraq_al_Qaeda_connection.jpg PJM's Richard Miniter interviews former "made man" Adullah Rahman al-Shamary - a possible "missing link" between Saddam and al Qaeda. This is the first of a series of special reports for PJM from Miniter who has recently returned from Iraq.

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The Sunshine of Our Lives

Monday, May 28th, 2007 - by Rick Moran

anewbanks.jpg"It's a beautiful day for a ballgame... Let's play two!" A statue of baseball great Ernie Banks will rise at Wrigley Field. by Rick Moran


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America the Beautiful

Monday, May 28th, 2007

Ray Charles sings it.

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Week 19 of Pajamas Poll in Progress – F. Thompson, Richardson still lead for Repubs and Dems – Get your WIDGET here

Monday, May 28th, 2007

Over 115,000 votes have been cast in the weekly PAJAMAS MEDIA PRESIDENTIAL STRAW POLL. The nineteenth week has officially begun. DON'T FORGET: You can put the poll on your website or blog with our free voting widget and become a precinct in the PJ Media Straw Poll. Learn how the readers of your site are voting and compare it the the total.

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Students Battle Regime at Iranian University

Sunday, May 27th, 2007


Pro-democracy students clash with Basiji (pro-Islamic Regime paramilitary forces) in this video smuggled out of Allameh University, Tehran, College of Social Sciences. It was shot Tuesday, May, 22nd, 2007 by Avayee Digar. Translation for PJM by Special Correspondent Ardershir Arian:

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[Book Review] The Consolation of the Shoes by Manolo the Shoeblogger

Saturday, May 26th, 2007 - by Roger L Simon


giorgioii.jpg Not The Manolo Full disclosure: The real The Manolo is a friend of mine and, no, I will not reveal his identity. Ergo, the review you are about to read is horribly biased. by Roger L. Simon

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Tales from the Coffee Crypt

Saturday, May 26th, 2007 - by Nancy Rommelmann


acoffeedrink.jpg In which the immutable rules of "coffee cupping" are learned in an ancient and overcaffeinated ritual. By Nancy Rommelmann

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Does Uttering the Word "Uterus" Really Clear a Room?

Saturday, May 26th, 2007

I typically don’t like to follow blog squabbles too much but a href=”http://volokh.com/archives/archive_2007_05_20-2007_05_26.shtml#1180045200″Eugene Volokh,/a who usually keeps his head above such things, a href=”http://althouse.blogspot.com/2007/05/uh-oh-i-made-eugene-volokh-talk-about.html”Ann Althouse, /aand a href=”http://feministlawprofs.law.sc.edu/?p=1832″Ann Bartow,/a a “feminist law professor,” have a rather heated discussion of women’s menstrual periods. I won’t go into the specifics (I am not entirely sure what they are–if you want to know, follow the links) but the patronizing and sexist statements from Ann Bartow regardinga href=”http://volokh.com/archives/archive_2007_05_20-2007_05_26.shtml#1179963785″ Eugene asking women how they felt about menstruation /acaught my eye. Eugene a href=”http://volokh.com/archives/archive_2007_05_20-2007_05_26.shtml#1180045200″mentions the statements /aand seems puzzled as to what he did wrong: br /br /Oh, and then there’s this from Prof. Bartow: strong”One thing I’ve learned is that if you want all the men to leave a room at breakneck speak, just uttering the word ‘uterus’ will sometimes do the trick”/strong (my emphasis). And Eugene’s response: “Huh, never seen that happen, but maybe I just hang out with the wrong crowd.”br /br /And apparently if anyone wants to know how women feel about their periods, they better do a full research project, including asking women in the Women’s Studies Department to help according to Bartow’s advice in response to a commenter at a href=”http://www.isthatlegal.org/archives/2007/05/really.html#comments”Is That Legal?:/abr /br /blockquoteWell here’s the thing, Patrick: There is a whole lot of diverse and interesting literature that has been *already written* that could bring Eugene up to speed a whole lot more effectively than the commenters at the Volokh conspiracy, if he was actually sincere about educating himself about menstruation. And I’m pretty sure UCLA has at least one library. It even has a Women’s Studies Department, not that I would ever expect Eugene to think he could learn anything from the faculty there./blockquotebr /br /Wow, so now for a lousy blog post, you are supposed to do a lit review and gather data from others in the field rather than just ask blog readers what they think? Sounds a little overboard, but I’ll play your silly game. I happened to have done this exact research when I talked with and evaluated 137 women and their instructors at the College of Liberal Arts and Human Ecology for my PHD dissertation entitled, “Angry Temperament and Locus of Control in Young Women with and without Prementrual Syndrome.” br /br /And what did I find? That a vast number of the men were sensitive and supportive to the women in their lives who had PMS symptoms. Rather than clearing the room when their significant other talked about PMS or menstruation, in my study, a full 42% of the women emwith/em PMS felt men were sensitive to their PMS. Even 29% of the women without PMS saw men as supportive during their menstrual period but many (38%) did not discuss it at all compared with 85% of the PMS group sharing their symptoms and concerns with men in their lives. So, to sum it up, even if a woman has severe PMS, 42% of the men in this study were supportive and helpful. Hardly evidence of men “clearing the room when the word uterus was uttered.” br /br /Maybe Ms. Bartow should take her own advice and do a literature review and talk with experts on men’s responses to women’s menstrual periods before she makes such sexist statements like she did about men clearing a room when the word uterus is used. But then, that would probably be too much to ask of a “feminist law professor” who probably thinks her “feelings” make her an expert on every subject.br /br /I will leave the last word to this insightful commenter– a href=”http://volokh.com/posts/1180045200.shtml#221661″Jim Hu at the VC who /aechoes my sentiments exactly in this quip: “Maybe it’s just me, but I’m guessing that saying ‘Feminist Law Professor’ is more likely to clear a room of men than ‘uterus’.”

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Doing the Right Thing

Friday, May 25th, 2007

Last year, a href=”http://drhelen.blogspot.com/2006/05/high-of-mount-everest-and-lows-of.html”I had a short post about the death /aof David Sharp who died on Mount Everest while an estimated 40 climbers went by without stopping to help. However, in the news today, it appears that at least some climbers are willing to lend a helping hand and a href=”http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,275380,00.html”even risk their own lives /ato help someone else (thanks to the reader who emailed me this story):br /br /blockquoteA stricken climber left to die on Mount Everest was saved by an American guide and a sherpa who found her by accident as they returned from the summit….br /br /Usha, like Sharp, was apparently on the sort of barebones expedition that charges clients typically as little as $8,933 and provides them with only basic equipment./blockquotebr /br /It seems like one should steer clear of these “barebones expeditions” unless they are extremely experienced and maybe even then. I imagine that the thrill for some of climbing Mount Everest is worth the risk but if something goes wrong, one is putting others in a postion to risk their lives also. But luckily, for the stricken climber, the American and his sherpa did the right thing. I wonder if the controversy over the Sharp case made them decide to do so or if they were just more altruistic than other climbers?

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Are Federal "Advocates" Standing in the Way of Sane Mental Health Laws?

Friday, May 25th, 2007

Psychiatrist Sally Satela href=”http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/013/679vkrbg.asp” has a thought provoking piece /ain emThe Weekly Standard/em entitled, “Sane Mental Health Laws?” Thanks to Bugs for pointing out the article:br /br /blockquoteThe Virginia Tech massacre last month will surely prompt changes in commitment laws too. Virginia governor Timothy M. Kaine has created a panel to review events and issue recommendations. The governor’s panel will join several other Virginia bodies already reviewing the state’s mental health laws.br /br /The most prominent is the Task Force on Civil Commitment. It was established six months ago by the chief justice of the Virginia Supreme Court to scrutinize the state’s unusually narrow standard for committing someone to a psychiatric facility against their wishes. (A patient must be “imminently” dangerous–in short, clearly ready to kill himself or someone else–before a judge can mandate treatment.)br /br /The task force proceedings are bitterly contentious. On one side are civil liberties lawyers and disgruntled patients who insist that lowering the “imminent” danger threshold would threaten individual rights. On the other side are psychiatrists caring for people with schizophrenia and bipolar illness and their relatives who have lived through the nightmare of not being able to get timely treatment for desperately ill loved ones./blockquotebr /br /The article tells about a case where a son is released from a mental hospital because of a patient advocacy group even though he had already assaulted his father but he was released anyway only to kill his mother with a hatchet two months later. Many of the readers here and others in society want to believe that oodles of slightly eccentric people are being rounded up in straitjackets to be warehoused at a hospital. This is so far from the truth, it is actually laughable. I have never met a patient who told me he or she was unfairly kept in a hospital but I have met and worked with many who cannot get the help they need or who have been released from treatment way too early. And what about the families of those mentally ill individuals who have been assaulted and are in fear for their lives or the lives of other family members. Do they have no rights at all? Apparently not.

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The Corn & Miniter Show — # 11

Friday, May 25th, 2007

In this week’s show, David Corn and Richard Miniter discuss Hillary’s campaign memo advising her to skip Iowa, McCain’s testy exchange with Romney and the impact of immigration on the GOP. They also talk about the latest Gallup poll and who might be the first candidate to be voted off the island.

Click above and watch! (MP3 audio-only version available HERE)

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First, Kill All the Judges

Friday, May 25th, 2007 - by Burt Prelutsky


judge.jpg A not-so-modest proposal for making America a better place... in a twinkling. By Burt Prelutsky

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The Bloomberg Gun Giveaway

Friday, May 25th, 2007 - by Frank Miniter


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Mayor Bloomberg's plan to gain anti-gun street cred backfires in Virginia. By Frank Miniter

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