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1001 Pieces of Islamist Propaganda: Fabricated Exhibit Comes to D.C.

At National Geographic headquarters, a wildly popular exhibit tells children of a glorious Islamic past that never was.

by
Pamela Geller

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August 25, 2012 - 12:00 am
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J. Christian Adams’ article “Fact or Fiction?: 1001 Muslim Inventions Comes to Washington D.C.” sheds light on an important but little-noted weapon of the Islamic propaganda machine in the U.S.: the whitewashing of the ghastly Islamic present by creating a fictional glorious Islamic past.

1001 Muslim Inventions, a traveling museum exhibit, has appeared all over the West to huge acclaim (Adams points out that Prince Charles and other luminaries have praised it; 500,000 visitors attended it in Los Angeles alone). It has indoctrinated hundreds of thousands of children into a rosy and romanticized view of Islam that makes them less appreciative of their own culture’s achievements and more complacent about Islamization in the West.

Sharia enforcement extends far beyond the obvious attempts to silence critics of jihad and sharia. The scrubbing of the 270 million victims of jihadi wars, land appropriations, cultural annihilations, and enslavements from academic texts has been going on for well over a decade. The demonization and smearing of politicians who dare speak against the most extreme and radical ideology on the face of the earth is virtually automatic at this point, as is the self-enforcing sharia compliance of the mainstream media.

And now we see historical revisionism take on a new life, as history is scrubbed and manufactured Muslim myths are presented as fact. Adams shows how effective it is, recounting in his piece that the exhibit presents a Muslim inventor, Abbas Ibn Firnas, as one who “dared to dream man could fly 1000 years before the Wright Brothers.” Firnas didn’t actually succeed in flying, of course, or come close to inventing the airplane. Adams writes:

Notice all of the tricks of language. He was the first “who tried to fly,” and “passed into legend,” “more or less unharmed,” the “flying machine,” (implying moving parts), and “apparently gliding for some distance.”

But Adams’ eight-year-old daughter seeing the exhibit, did not notice all the weasel words:

She was convinced that the Wright Brothers were not the first to fly, and instead it was Firnas launched from the mosque at Cordoba a millennium ago. This would not be the only instance when thought corrupted the language of the exhibit, which in turn corrupted thought, at least among the more impressionable.

By creating a children’s attraction, the exhibit is fostering a subliminal brainwashing that will move into the public schools as well.

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