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Rubin Reports

The Truths About Terrorism, Whose Names They Dare Not Speak

April 29th, 2013 - 9:05 am

Of course, different people bring different attitudes. It is the job of the immigration system to profile the immigrants to decide who is going to be a good citizen, or even who should be let in. Was it a mistake that Tamerlan’s brother did become a U.S. citizen pretty easily? No, it was neither a mistake nor a conspiracy. It was the way profiling was defined that made it possible. To have a serious discussion about why some immigrants become loyal, productive citizens and others become terrorists would be an important discussion. But it cannot happen at present because it would have to include factoring in such things as personal responsibility, gratitude to one’s adopted country, and even — totally unthinkable — the need to keep in mind the immigrant’s original home.

The latter point is not to make it a focus to block people from the Middle East.

On the contrary, those who wanted to flee or had to do so were often motivated because they wanted to live in a democratic, free country and not under revolutionary Islamism. If you are in the United States, you will be meeting a lot more such people, especially from Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria, very soon.

A second point would be to stress the benefits that the Tsarnaev brothers and their family were given. Among them were welfare payments, a scholarship, acceptance without bias into American society, permissiveness even when they violated its tenets and laws (beating his girlfriend), not doing anything to them despite suspicion of being potential terrorists (unlike what would have happened in Russia), and so on.

Against that long list of things, the article had to focus on the boxing setback as they key to everything.

The New York Times could not go further. For to step into that territory would require considering: the failure of a historic policy to assimilate immigrants that has been replaced by multiculturalism; the abandonment of patriotism and the distaste for America and its society daily expressed by the citizens of Boston met by the Tsarnaevs; and the idea of entitlement and the welfare state that pervaded their concept of America.

Yes, there is ample material for biographical and psychological writing. But what about, for example, this potential opening for the article:

Tamerlan Tsarnaev found in America a society that did not require him to become loyal to the country, to understand how well it treated his family, and how he could actually spend his time reading terrorist sites on the Internet while his beaten wife worked 80 hours a week and his family collected welfare. Spoiled by good treatment from America, he became more Islamic and turned to terrorism.

Why is such a theme inconceivable? Because of the reporters’ politics and ideology.

Deborah Sontag has won lots of awards. But in my neighborhood she’s best known as the reporter who covered Israel at a time when it was beset by the worst Palestinian terrorism. And then, after the Palestinian leaders had rejected peace and a two-state solution, when they were fostering the deliberate murder of civilians, she concluded of them: “Blocked by bad treatment from [Israel] … turned to terrorism.”

The journalist Joan Walsh explained this ruling ideology from a different angle. All this stuff about Islam and Chechens? “In the end, it’s not important.” She added:

I really do think that this whole discussion … proves once again that race is entirely a political and social construct. … We really don’t want to acknowledge these boys have as much in common with Timothy McVeigh and — actually, more to the point, with school shooters. The Columbine killers, James Holmes, then really they do with hardened jihadis. … They are a product of America as well as a product of alienation.

One wonders why Walsh didn’t say:

They are a product of America as well as a product of alienation, Islam, and a radical revolutionary Islamist movement.

She couldn’t say that, as that would transcend her ideology and make her unpopular in her milieu. Her internal cultural-intellectual censor wouldn’t let her do that.

Reducing the motives for terrorism into psychobabble is to disarm one’s society from being able to combat terrorism. It is amazing to see a democratic society’s intellectual assets turn to the task of systematic obfuscation, as even the most ridiculous arguments flourish.

For example, people who go on suicide terrorist missions don’t get to be hardened jihadis, because they don’t live long enough. And the whole point is that they can behave that way because they don’t need to be “hardened.” They can already:

(1) Settle into an identity that fits with revolutionary activity and terrorism;

(2) Get huge encouragement from an existing movement that even rules entire countries;

(3) Receive direct training from terrorist forces that operate in safe havens;

(4) Don’t believe that their identities and grievances are mere constructs. One doesn’t fight and die for a construct.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
Politics is always down stream of culture...so is crime. It's interesting that your American FBI "cannot name the enemy"...but the FBI's list of "Ten Most Wanted" fugitives can. From Daniel Pipes (today)--check the notes at the end:

"...the list of "Most Wanted Terrorists" dates back to just after 9/11 and sense that terrorism had become a strategic threat. Today, the list includes 31 individuals, all of them male and with a single exception (Daniel Andreas San Diego, an animal rights extremist), all of them Muslim:

Abd al Aziz Awda – 1950, Palestinian, Palestinian Islamic Jihad
Abdelkarim Hussein Mohamed Al-Nasser – ca. 1947, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Abdul Rahman Yasin – 1960, American, World Trade Center bombing in 1993
Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah – 1963, Egyptian, Kenya and Tanzania embassy bombings in 1998
Adam Yahiye Gadahn – 1978, American, Al-Qaeda
Adnan G. El Shukrijumah – 1975, Guyanese, Al-Qaeda
Ahmad Ibrahim Al-Mughassil – 1967, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Ali Atwa – ca. 1960, Lebanese, TWA hijacking in 1985
Ali Saed Bin Ali El-Hoorie – 1965, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Anas Al-Liby – 1964, Libyan, Kenya and Tanzania embassy bombings in 1998
Ayman Al-Zawahiri – 1951, Egyptian, Al-Qaeda
Faouzi Mohamad Ayoub – 1966, Lebanese, Lebanese Hizbullah
Hakimullah Mehsud – ca. 1980, Pakistani, Pakistani Taliban
Hasan Izz-Al-Din – 1963, Lebanese, TWA hijacking in 1985
Husayn Muhammad Al-Umari – 1936, Lebanese, 15 May Organization
Ibrahim Salih Mohammed Al-Yacoub – 1966, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Isnilon Totoni Hapilon – 1966, Filipino, Abu Sayyaf Group
Jaber A. Elbaneh – 1966, Yemeni, Al-Qaeda
Jamal Saeed Abdul Rahim – 1965, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Jamel Ahmed Mohammed Ali Al-Badawi – 1960, Yemeni, USS Cole bombing in 2000
Jehad Serwan Mostafa – 1981, American, Al-Shabaab
Mohammed Ali Hamadei – 1964, Lebanese, Lebanese Hizbullah
Muhammad Abdullah Khalil Hussain Ar-Rahayyal – 1965, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Muhammad Ahmed Al-Munawar – 1965, Palestinian, Abu Nidal Organization
Omar Shafik Hammami – 1984, American, Al-Shabaab
Raddulan Sahiron – ca. 1936, Filipino, Abu Sayyaf Group
Ramadan Abdullah Mohammad Shallah – 1958, Palestinian, Palestinian Islamic Jihad
Saif Al-Adel – ca. 1960, Egyptian, Al-Qaeda
Wadoud Muhammad Hafiz Al-Turki – 1955, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Zulkifli Abdhir – 1966, Malaysian, Kumpulun Mujahidin Malaysia
Comments:
(1) Muslims make up 30 out of 31 most wanted terrorists, or about 97 percent of them. That's a pretty good indication of what Bernard Lewis' 1990 article famously called "Muslim rage" and why Islam-related issues have such prominence.
(2). Islamists make up 27 out of those 30; only the three perpetrators of the Pan Am 73 hijacking in 1986 (Rahayyal, Munawar, Turki), all connected to the Abu Nidal Organization, are not Islamists (or at least were not in 1986). This predominance of jihad reflects the Islamist hegemony among politically extreme Muslims.
(3) Ethnic Arabs make up 25 of the 30 terrorists. The largest numbers are 4 each of Lebanese, Palestinians, and Saudis, 3 each of Americans and Egyptians. Non-ethnic Arabs include 2 Filipinos, 1 Malaysian, 1 Pakistani, and 1 American convert. This high percentage confirms the sense that Arabic-speakers have the most pent-up hostility toward Americans.
(4) Most attacks by these most wanted fugitives date from the 1980s and 1990s – Khobar, TWA 847, East African embassies, WTC bombing. Symbolically of this relative antiquity, the only American airlines attacked by them were Pan American and TWA, both long defunct. This points to the greater success since 9/11 in both foiling and tracking terrorism, thanks to greater resources and more diligence.
(5) Also reflecting the long-ago quality of this most wanted list, note the striking pattern of their decadal birthdates:
1930s – 2
1940s – 1
1950s – 4
1960s – 18
1970s – 2
1980s – 3
1990s – 0
The average age is close to 50 – not exactly the prime time of life for terrorism. The youngest listee, Hammami, will be 29 years old in less than a week. The eldest two, Umari and Sahiron, are approaching 80. (April 30, 2013)
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
When you have the president, his administration, and the leadership of a majority of the govt agencies in our DoJ and law enforcement agencies in bed with the Muslim Brotherhood, you're going to have civilization jihad gaining ground. And that's what this is, stealth/civilization jihad which will destroy America, our way of life, our Constitution, and everything we hold dear. It will ultimately be up to the people to reject the totalitarian ideology known as Islam and Sharia Law. They are totally incompatible with everything that makes this country great.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (27)
All Comments   (27)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Hey Barry, if you are still perusing the comments, check out this video...

Stephen Coughlin, Part. 6: The Boston Attack and "Individual Jihad"'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=A0l_4udm-A4

50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
I liked Judge Jeanie Pirro's contribution to the national conversation...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=AkzNL69L_h0
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
It seems to me there are two types of Muslims - those that are active Jihadists and those that are passive Jihadists. The active Jihadists commit acts of terror in the name of Allah. The passive Jihadists support the active Jihadists or at least remain silent in the face of Jihadi savagery. In addition, the passives are the recruit pool for the actives. Potentially all are threats to the peace and liberty of all non-Muslims. It seems to me to be short sighted at best to permit Muslims of any stripe to infect the United States.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Politics is always down stream of culture...so is crime. It's interesting that your American FBI "cannot name the enemy"...but the FBI's list of "Ten Most Wanted" fugitives can. From Daniel Pipes (today)--check the notes at the end:

"...the list of "Most Wanted Terrorists" dates back to just after 9/11 and sense that terrorism had become a strategic threat. Today, the list includes 31 individuals, all of them male and with a single exception (Daniel Andreas San Diego, an animal rights extremist), all of them Muslim:

Abd al Aziz Awda – 1950, Palestinian, Palestinian Islamic Jihad
Abdelkarim Hussein Mohamed Al-Nasser – ca. 1947, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Abdul Rahman Yasin – 1960, American, World Trade Center bombing in 1993
Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah – 1963, Egyptian, Kenya and Tanzania embassy bombings in 1998
Adam Yahiye Gadahn – 1978, American, Al-Qaeda
Adnan G. El Shukrijumah – 1975, Guyanese, Al-Qaeda
Ahmad Ibrahim Al-Mughassil – 1967, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Ali Atwa – ca. 1960, Lebanese, TWA hijacking in 1985
Ali Saed Bin Ali El-Hoorie – 1965, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Anas Al-Liby – 1964, Libyan, Kenya and Tanzania embassy bombings in 1998
Ayman Al-Zawahiri – 1951, Egyptian, Al-Qaeda
Faouzi Mohamad Ayoub – 1966, Lebanese, Lebanese Hizbullah
Hakimullah Mehsud – ca. 1980, Pakistani, Pakistani Taliban
Hasan Izz-Al-Din – 1963, Lebanese, TWA hijacking in 1985
Husayn Muhammad Al-Umari – 1936, Lebanese, 15 May Organization
Ibrahim Salih Mohammed Al-Yacoub – 1966, Saudi, Saudi Hizbullah
Isnilon Totoni Hapilon – 1966, Filipino, Abu Sayyaf Group
Jaber A. Elbaneh – 1966, Yemeni, Al-Qaeda
Jamal Saeed Abdul Rahim – 1965, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Jamel Ahmed Mohammed Ali Al-Badawi – 1960, Yemeni, USS Cole bombing in 2000
Jehad Serwan Mostafa – 1981, American, Al-Shabaab
Mohammed Ali Hamadei – 1964, Lebanese, Lebanese Hizbullah
Muhammad Abdullah Khalil Hussain Ar-Rahayyal – 1965, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Muhammad Ahmed Al-Munawar – 1965, Palestinian, Abu Nidal Organization
Omar Shafik Hammami – 1984, American, Al-Shabaab
Raddulan Sahiron – ca. 1936, Filipino, Abu Sayyaf Group
Ramadan Abdullah Mohammad Shallah – 1958, Palestinian, Palestinian Islamic Jihad
Saif Al-Adel – ca. 1960, Egyptian, Al-Qaeda
Wadoud Muhammad Hafiz Al-Turki – 1955, Palestinian, Pan Am hijacking in 1986
Zulkifli Abdhir – 1966, Malaysian, Kumpulun Mujahidin Malaysia
Comments:
(1) Muslims make up 30 out of 31 most wanted terrorists, or about 97 percent of them. That's a pretty good indication of what Bernard Lewis' 1990 article famously called "Muslim rage" and why Islam-related issues have such prominence.
(2). Islamists make up 27 out of those 30; only the three perpetrators of the Pan Am 73 hijacking in 1986 (Rahayyal, Munawar, Turki), all connected to the Abu Nidal Organization, are not Islamists (or at least were not in 1986). This predominance of jihad reflects the Islamist hegemony among politically extreme Muslims.
(3) Ethnic Arabs make up 25 of the 30 terrorists. The largest numbers are 4 each of Lebanese, Palestinians, and Saudis, 3 each of Americans and Egyptians. Non-ethnic Arabs include 2 Filipinos, 1 Malaysian, 1 Pakistani, and 1 American convert. This high percentage confirms the sense that Arabic-speakers have the most pent-up hostility toward Americans.
(4) Most attacks by these most wanted fugitives date from the 1980s and 1990s – Khobar, TWA 847, East African embassies, WTC bombing. Symbolically of this relative antiquity, the only American airlines attacked by them were Pan American and TWA, both long defunct. This points to the greater success since 9/11 in both foiling and tracking terrorism, thanks to greater resources and more diligence.
(5) Also reflecting the long-ago quality of this most wanted list, note the striking pattern of their decadal birthdates:
1930s – 2
1940s – 1
1950s – 4
1960s – 18
1970s – 2
1980s – 3
1990s – 0
The average age is close to 50 – not exactly the prime time of life for terrorism. The youngest listee, Hammami, will be 29 years old in less than a week. The eldest two, Umari and Sahiron, are approaching 80. (April 30, 2013)
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mr. Rubin,

I disagree with your logic, and I understand you have more experience with Muslims than most individuals who post here.

In time, I believe I will be proven correct. The problem is the Koran, and there is no extreme Islam. There is just following Muhammad, and worshiping my god of the Kaabba.The loyality of the Ummah is to the Koran, not any country.

How do you change culture? Bring in millions of Muslims.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
'willingness to take its benefits as if they were owed to oneself'

Otherwise know as jizya. There's no shame or crisis of conscience, it's their's as a right.

We are also seeing CAIR in it's frantic repudiation of the American law for America legal edicts which states are adopting or battling over, quite openly shilling for Sharia.

Remember the USA is the Dar el Harb just waiting for the pleasures of Islam to be bestowed.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
When you have the president, his administration, and the leadership of a majority of the govt agencies in our DoJ and law enforcement agencies in bed with the Muslim Brotherhood, you're going to have civilization jihad gaining ground. And that's what this is, stealth/civilization jihad which will destroy America, our way of life, our Constitution, and everything we hold dear. It will ultimately be up to the people to reject the totalitarian ideology known as Islam and Sharia Law. They are totally incompatible with everything that makes this country great.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
And for information, these passages of the Koran were cited by others and seem to be very indicative of what we are fighting.

Quran (8:12) - "I will cast terror into the hearts of those who disbelieve. Therefore strike off their heads and strike off every fingertip of them.

Qur'an (3:54) - “And they (the disbelievers) schemed, and Allah schemed (against them): and Allah is the best of schemers


‘When thy Lord was revealing to the angels, ‘I am with you; so confirm the believers. I shall cast into the unbelievers’ hearts terror; so smite above the necks, and smite every finger of them!” – Quran 8:12.”

Personally when you talk about a schemer, it makes one wonder how one can believe the person, and others have spoken about how the Koran accepts lies in the furtherance of the religion. So a religion based on lies and where do you get the truth, if lying is accepted.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, now let's go a bit further. They do it because it is part of their milieu, but now we come to the forbidden zone: guilt by association.

A lot of groups here are afraid of that one, because they are on-board with some very bad groups, but they do not want to bear the consequences of the help they give the actors.

In Islam there are no innocent bystanders: if you are a bystander, you are helping what evil is being done.

Nothing will happen until we have guilt by association, realizing that there would be no terrorism without enablers, that are now considered innocent.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
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