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Klavan On The Culture

Kill Your Darlings: A Startling Take on the Beats

December 2nd, 2013 - 12:19 pm

Man, I’m Beat!

I watched this film over the Thanksgiving weekend and the more I think about it, the more I think its approach to its subject is kind of remarkable.

Kill Your Darlings is based on the true story of a murder that took place at the inception of the Beat literary movement. It stars former Harry Potter Daniel Radcliffe as the poet Allen Ginsberg and details how, as a student at Columbia University, Ginsberg came under the sway of his charismatic fellow student Lucien Carr, played by Dane DeHaan. With William S. Burroughs (Ben Foster) and Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston), the group conceived the idea of the New Vision, which ultimately produced Ginsberg’s famous neo-Whitmanesque poem Howl, Burroughs’ Naked Lunch and Kerouac’s On the Road.

But before all that happened, Carr stabbed then drowned his sometime lover David Kammerer (played by Dexter’s excellent Michael Hall), claiming Kammerer had attempted to sexually assault him. Because of a law that gave special dispensation to straight men under attack by homosexuals, Carr got off with a light sentence and went on to a long career with United Press International. I will refrain from making any comments about the kind of people who go into mainstream journalism. The facts speak for themselves — or would, if there weren’t mainstream journalists to cover them up!

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Top Rated Comments   
That's the Romantic Myth and has been responsible for many broken lives and a lot of bad art.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
If you look at the late 40's in America, the two most significant developments, artistic developments, were the Beat "vision" as presented in Kerouac's On The Road and Ginsberg's Howl, and film noire coming out of Hollywood. What did they have in common? The flip side of American optimism. And they were inevitable. Why? Because the country had just been through a world war and no matter how positively that war was sold as both necessary and a victory over evil, the fact remains that the war, on both the home front and the battle front was traumatic. How could it not have been? The great majority of veterans came home and furiously threw themselves into making the most normal family forming and family centered lives possible. And there's no denying that that was a good thing. Growth and prosperity were explosive in the 50's and both film noire and the Beats were a curious sideshow, definitely out of step. But there was also a hollowness in the 50's that finally came roaring back, seemingly out of nowhere, in the 60's. Except it didn't come out of nowhere. It was the delayed effect of the war, that great underminer of certainty. That effect had first registered in the Beats and in film noire -- forerunners of the crisis that broke fifteen years later and that we live with still.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
The Beat Generation were America's first politically correct identity-slummers. "Hey look, a negro jazz club. Hey, look - a prostitute. Look, a real homeless guy. Cool!!!" It's intellectual slumming. I'm not saying they were the first kids to ever be dazzled by anything exotic, but they were the first ones in America to institutionalize it into a racket and finally a system of gov't.

"Hey look! An real illegal alien! That's "nobility" right there, man."

"What? You actually saw one? Write about it dude."

Nobility as long as they don't actually have too many of them in their own neighborhoods, or black folks, or homeless people, or fascinating cool prostitutes. That's slumming. Like touring a shanty town and then heading back to the five-star hotel.

They purposefully didn't hold jobs so they could play at being poor and "having" to hitchhike and all the rest of their rot. That's not living on the edge - that's standing on the edge of a cliff on purpose. It's slumming, the same way so many people today triumphantly hold up the noble Third World they wouldn't for one moment go back to or live in if they knew they could never leave. The same way middle-class kids live in squats they don't have to. They know they always have their parents to go back to. Real poor people have no such luxury.

To me, "On the Road" is boring and intellectually and artistically dishonest. I always laughed at people who saw it as the "real deal." It's no more the real deal than someone telling me about a zoo they just visited as being the same as being attacked by a hippo while washing your clothes.

One doesn't "create" adventures, adventures happen to you. If they don't - tough - your life is safe and boring - deal with it. Punching a cop on purpose and then bragging about it like they got caught in a tornado is something I've actually seen people do. In a real adventure, you head the other way and try and make your life safe, not run into a burning jazz club cuz because you suffer from ennui.

Kerouac should've named his book "On Safari In My Back Yard."
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (49)
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Saw this a few days ago; it's probably not in theaters any more.

Thank you, Andrew K., for the review. It's spot-on.

This movie is -not- in any way catharsis. (Sorry, Aristotle.) It ends with questions that fester like an open sore. The homosexual love scenes are intercut with scenes from the murder to inflame the shock value. It works.

The movie made me cringe from beginning to end. There was a kind of a horrible corrupt innocence in much of it, like a toddler at the wheel of V10 pickup. Those on the right will point to the parallel moral poisoning of individual lives and society; those on the left will say "See the price these people paid at the ends of the repressed and judgemental elements of society." But many may find themselves uncomfortable with that answer.
49 weeks ago
49 weeks ago Link To Comment
Don't know about the Beats. Never took an interest.

Now, the hollowness of the 50's...I have been treated to the oldies channel at work during lunch. It was a revelation.

The music of the 50's was...horrible. Just awful! Souless, mind numbing crap!

Imagine, growing up listening to that psychotic drek. Sung by singers who had no emotion, or any kind of brainwaves at all.

I should be more specific...50's music, by WHITE PEOPLE, was horrible. Almost a Satanic curse. Were they even human, these people?

So, you grow up, in this horrible musical place, (and the movies! just as bad!) listening to your parents say how great it all is, and how dumb those black folks are.

Then, one day, you go see Bo Didley in concert.

The man INVENTED rock and roll! A BLACK man!

I would never listen to anything my parents ever said ever again. Never! That includes "don't drink that poison" and "Take your finger out of the electrical socket".

America went thru two world wars, a depression, and people really wonder what went wrong.

Both wars were completly unneccessary, the depression showed capitalism, and the republican form of government, to be total failures. America just barely survived.

The land of the free turned out to be the land of the dumb, and the home of the stupid. The "Greatest" generation, was not up to the task of fixing the problem. So they gave up. They have left it up to us.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, Xiaoding, you've got one of the worst cases of Chronological Snobbery that I've ever seen.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
There is a anger, an eternal hatred, like the heat of a thousand suns, that springs from having to listen to that stuff at lunch.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
You lack historical perspective, my friend. You should take interest in the Beats because they are your intellectual forefathers. Like you they offered a shallow version of American culture, which they easily rejected and replaced with. . .what? An even more shallow culture based on leftist politics and the parts of Eastern and native American cultures that seemed cool. Looking at the culture that was developed by wise old white men, they first rejected the old, then the white, then the men, and finally the wisdom. That is where we are today. The Brokaw generation did not give up; they were just wrong, and their children even more so. It does not seem to be getting better. If it is up to you to "fix the problem," I do not feel confident.

50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
They gave up...on not eliminating the standing army, on keeping the States superior to the Federal government, on not having the Bill of Rights apply only to the Federal government, and not the States, on keeping a constitutional American Republic. On elevating the Supreme Court to the Supreme Dictators. No lovers of freedom, these people. No intellect, either.

All of which, they could have done, and still be ok. The problem was, they let it happen, without any decision, without calling a constitutional convention, and voting on it, and in the light of day, saying that from now on, these things would be so. They just let it all happen. No declaration, no honoring the sanctity of the Republic. Eisenhower alone spoke out, no one listened.

And then, the Vietnam war, the greatest lie of the greatest lying generation. A deceit that rings through the ages. It may have damaged America fatally, it's not over yet.

So, you blame their children, for being a bit lost? Really? Say it ain't so!
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
ricpic has a good point in saying that WWII was important in preparing our culture for the 1960s revolution, but I also agree with those others who point out that “self-doubt” is not the full explanation and that developments before WWII were also important.

American culture was liberalizing throughout the 20th-century; the frontier was conquered; industrialism was rising; and as affluence and security rose -- modernization and its cultural creations in journalism, literature, film, art, and music pressed society for more self-expression, a relief from conformism, and greater freedom from social control. BUT, just as the 1920s-decade got really going with its flamboyance and materialism: the Great Depression struck and stopped the celebration. It turned the attention of most people to survival. WWII followed and increased stress and fear for the nation’s future even more. The war required enormous courage and the experiencing of horrendous realities.

The double-whammy of the Great Depression and WWII returned the nation to earlier conservative values, traditional spirituality, and social responsibility. The Cold War, arising just as WWII was still smoldering, added to the tension.

Yet, at the same time, the ideas of modernization kept percolating (surrealism, Dadaism, Henry Miller, Cubism, dissonant music, the record-player and radio and its dispersal of popular music, jazz, and swing; and, of course, movies). Two elements were clashing (the repression to anchor and guide society, and on the other hand the yearning to be free) but they had to clash internally because outside of the psyche we had to keep responsible and survive amidst the pressure of poverty and war.

The Beats represent that unconscious internal dissent against the self-control that was necessary for survival during that time. The Beats were small in number but represented a potentiality. Burroughs and Ginsberg and Kerouac were misfits during their youth, well-educated, brilliant; “free” of religious or community control. They wanted to express themselves and saw everyone around them as robotic and repressed automatons. They seemed oblivious to the war. They took their opportunity to study in America’s greatest universities for granted. They “deserved” to be accepted and to enjoy the fruits of the land because they breathed. They were discovering poetry and drugs and bliss. Why was society so stingy with its largess (they cried)? What about ME?

Then, when WWII was over and affluence and security sprang forth across the land, the social control came off and the two tendencies had at each other. Inevitably, the liberalizing dynamic ate away through the culture and social fabric among the young of the 1960s –- who hadn’t known hard times or fear -– and the surface shell burst.

The 1960s was a vast volcano purging the inner-life of the ID of its pent-up repression to the Super Ego. In the revolution there was a lack of perspective. The trashing of all morality and social sensibility opened the scene to just anything. There was a sense in the 1960s that a whole new vision of what life could be was coming into being, and that literal political revolution was near.

But, of course, none of the young knew anything about difficulty and the necessity of limited social control in order to create something new. Effort was required, trained struggle, and serious moral restraints. But those features required a connection with those who were older, and that was now all gone. The rebellion was NOW! It was all Tune in, Turn on, and Drop out. Let’s live for us!
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
"But, of course, none of the young knew anything about difficulty and the necessity of limited social control in order to create something new. Effort was required, trained struggle, and serious moral restraints. But those features required a connection with those who were older, and that was now all gone. The rebellion was NOW! It was all Tune in, Turn on, and Drop out. Let’s live for us!"

Well, they did stop Southeners from hanging black people from trees, and burning them alive, for various spurious reasons. So...there's that.

Also, they protested the Vietnam war, although they couldn't quite tell why it was wrong, they just knew it was. So...theres that, too.

Also, they turned music into a genuine art form, along with movies, which had been almost totally destroyed in the '50's. So...there's that too.

Yeah, there was some selfishness there.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Fighting Communism was wrong? Since when? Where exactly did they get that idea?
49 weeks ago
49 weeks ago Link To Comment
"American culture was liberalizing throughout the 20th-century..."

True. I think the "revolution" of the 1960s had already started in the 1920s, but as you said, the Depression and WWII put a damper on it. There was more mainstream pushback against Roaring 20s decadence, too - the film code for example. In the 60s, on the other hand, the mainstream sort of collapsed, or at least went with the current.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Good post. I remember that when all social hell finally broke loose there were people I knew who were in their 30s and 40s who were green with envy at all the freedoms being enjoyed by younger people. There weren't just teeny-boppers wanting to get in on the act, but also older men growing their hair long and women too old for mini-skirts wearing them anyway. It was madness.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
This "Beat Generation" revival of sorts and its re-hashing [no pun intended] by this new movie, then adding the inclusion of the materialistic 1950's, the manifest confusions of the Sixties, on and on -- can be very easily overdrawn, even if it is entertaining now among folks who can look back with a grimace and say, "Did I do that stuff?....whew!".

"Slumming" was a term I remember hearing being used when I was a child of the 1930's when we really had slums. Then, that was the 'jazzy, snazzy' thing more affluent young folks did for "experience". Today we call that being "cool". I remember "cool" guys in the 1940's when I was in High School. That word was used then. Shirt collars turned up.

Also, those at college during the Depression on a Monday morning, after their "experience" slumming, they were back in class at their large University while others really were standing in breadlines. We really did have breadlines. For food.

My still clear [....and newly revived here....] memories of the "Beats" were, and remain, that they were pretty much pretentiously trashy guys who actually needed a bath and fresh clothes. That was their type of cultivated ostentation, their "statement".

Why romanticize/glamorize this sleaze?

50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Why romanticize/glamourize this sleaze?" Television happened, that's why. That's how I, as a 13-year-old in rural New England, heard about how cool they were. If you recall, the hippies of the '60s were also more or less created by the media. They were first publicized on TV, then print media like Time and Life magazines and finally the movies. The smartest thing the lefties ever did was realize the power that was television and seize it for their very own.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
So true. I call them Presstitutes. Good article.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't know how I developed the ability to never ever accept expert opinion uncritically, but I first read 'Howl' when I was 13 and I hated it. My teacher told me how wonderful it was, and when she asked me what I thought I said it was garbage. She seemed shocked that I would disagree with all the experts and told me I so, but fortunately I'm pretty stubborn. I hated 'Great Expectations' that same year, but loved the 'Iliad' and 'Odyssey' and 'L'Morte d'Arthur.' I read 'Walden' and 'On the Road' and 'Grendel' years later, and hated them too. I reread all of the above in my 30s, and it turns out despite all the changes in my ideas and prejudices, in that area I remained unchanged since the age of 13. The Beats (and Thoreau) were just a bunch of poser hypocrites, and their work was crap.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Rennie! How dare you refuse to shut up and take your medicine? How will you ever become a Well Rounded Person if you insist on reading books you like?

I had exactly the same experience in school, but with different books.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Jack Kerouac was actually a rather conservative fellow and not a proto-Leftist. If he were alive today I'm guessing he'd be writing anti-Progressive literature (i.e., anti-authoritarian).
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
If you look at the late 40's in America, the two most significant developments, artistic developments, were the Beat "vision" as presented in Kerouac's On The Road and Ginsberg's Howl, and film noire coming out of Hollywood. What did they have in common? The flip side of American optimism. And they were inevitable. Why? Because the country had just been through a world war and no matter how positively that war was sold as both necessary and a victory over evil, the fact remains that the war, on both the home front and the battle front was traumatic. How could it not have been? The great majority of veterans came home and furiously threw themselves into making the most normal family forming and family centered lives possible. And there's no denying that that was a good thing. Growth and prosperity were explosive in the 50's and both film noire and the Beats were a curious sideshow, definitely out of step. But there was also a hollowness in the 50's that finally came roaring back, seemingly out of nowhere, in the 60's. Except it didn't come out of nowhere. It was the delayed effect of the war, that great underminer of certainty. That effect had first registered in the Beats and in film noire -- forerunners of the crisis that broke fifteen years later and that we live with still.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
excellent observation
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Good post but help me one thing. What is the hollowness of the 50's? Was it that man is evil in nature thus our having to fight a traumatic war and burying oneself in family (generally a happy engagement) hid the nature of human evil? And that evil did not show itself until the 60's? Just trying to understand you post. Thanks.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
The hollowness of the 50's wasn't that a war to defeat the Nazis had been fought and won and it wasn't that the veterans who had fought that war came back to build families and lead productive lives; the hollowness was doubt. America seemed to be a very strong house when the spirit of the 60's - which was thoroughly nihilist behind the peace and love smokescreen - came along and blew the house down. Why did the house go down? Why was it so easy to blow the house down? Because those who had built the house had grave doubts about their own project. And the germ of those doubts had been planted by the very real and prolonged trauma of WW II. A war of that totality tears down faith in the core values people live by up to that war. The old values go on, but inside, inside belief has been lost. That was the hollowness of the 50's. It was inside. And it took only a push to collapse the old values, the entire old way of life.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
None of that really rings true for me. I don't think it was a case of self-doubt since that generation of the '50s had a rather laissez-faire attitude about ideology and philosophy and were more grounded in pragmatism.

The great divide and generation gap the '60s gathered around was symbolized by the Vietnam War. The new kids on the block felt their parents had gone from fighting "good wars" to thinking if they fought any war it was by definition "good" simply because Americans were Americans.

Identity had replaced principle and a new generation was determined to restore that imbalance by looking at the interior of a thing to gauge its worth rather than a flag.

Ironically the cure was worse than the disease as the "goodness" Americans thought resided in themselves rather than what they did was replaced by a default "badness" of anything American in an overreaction.

Even worse, the same failure of identity as a determinant of worth rather than actions came to reside in the main symbols of the '60s: women, non-whites and to a lesser extent, gays.

Just as America could do no wrong in the eyes of the "greatest generation" even while committing the war crime of Vietnam, now blacks and women could do no wrong even while indulging in today's modern hate speech against men and whites. America couldn't be wrong about Vietnam was replaced by women can't be sexist and blacks can't be racist and gays can't simply disdain straights.

That same failure of using identity to determine right from wrong rather than right and wrong itself is where we sit today and is the great cultural gap around which we fight and arrange ourselves.

In essence liberals have become more conservative than the '50s since liberals have politicized every blade of grass whereas people in the '50s generally were the opposite of radicalized or politicized and tended to take life as it came. There were few crusades and today everything is a crusade, even vegetables at the market and pie-charts of how many women get reviewed by the NY Times as opposed to men.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
I guess you had to be there. It sounds like the entire population had PTSD and so weren't "there" for their kids.

Still not sure what you mean by "grave doubts." Using the WWI analogy, as I understand it, Germans, Brits, Italians, etc., thought they were at the absolute pinnacle of human development. Then these superior human beings spent five years using every resource of their brilliant, enlightened, European civilization to slaughter each other in the mud like animals, on an industrial scale. Everything they had developed - science, techology, art, politics - all of that good stuff was directed toward the goal of mass death. I can understand the Europeans being a bit cynical about themselves after that.

So what was it with us Americans after WWII? Was some myth we had about ourselves shattered? Like we discovered Parson Weems' Washington used his little hatchet to chop up his grandmother? Did the men and women who lived through it simply lose their innocence? What, specifically, polluted people's minds to the extent that they no longer believed in anything?
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
War often results in promiscuity and cultural breakdown. In a way, the late-40s and '50s in America go against that tendency, with the strong peaceful and responsible pursuits that ricpic described. Yet the seeds of the destructive 60's had been there since before WWII, and slowly seemed to sprout soon after the War. And yet, the presence of those seeds doesn't completely explain why the 60's happened.

The ideas which led to the French Revolution, Darwinism, Marxism and secularism in general were starting to take root pretty well back into the 19th Century. Christianity had been losing its grip on the culture. Europe was shattered once again after WWII, and Existentialism and Marxism rushed into the void, and these movements weren't totally ignored over here.

ricpic's suggestion of the widespread doubt engendered by WWII is very interesting, but I'm not so sure that explains it all. While many American servicemen did witness terrible things, and had to have been deeply effected and psychologically wounded, lots of other servicemen returned without what would seem to be lasting scars. My Dad saw action in a bomber over Germany, getting shot at by flak and attacked by German fighters, yet he never seemed to exhibit PTSD-type symptoms. I've known WWII veterans who were very similar to him. And while men tended to hide that dark side of themselves much more in those days, I don't think that "the entire population had PTSD."

Many people who lived through WWII and the Depression were fiercely determined to make better lives for their children. Maybe in the process they understandably placed too high a value on conformity, which helped encourage a major explosion in the culture later on.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
You mention the cultural changes and isms that sprang up in the 19th century, which was also a period of Christians developing new cult-like off-shoots, sometimes even utopian in flavor, such as the Shakers. The industrial revolution probably was responsible for that anxiety and this uneasiness hasn't really ever gone away. Today it manifests itself in extreme environmentalism.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, I think the most significant reason for the ruin of our culture was the decline of Christianity and the embrace of other evil doctrines. And, as you wrote elsewhere artghost, mass media was used to promote very bad ideas and influences. This had a terrible effect.

Wow, what a fun, interesting discussion! Its like back in the glory days of PJMedia comments, before the new flashy comments system was put in place that encourages more comments by those who foam at the mouth and spout slogans! I was starting to lose hope in PJMedia, but I'm glad to see there are still so many thoughtful commenters here!
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Yes, I think the most significant reason for the ruin of our culture was the decline of Christianity and the embrace of other evil doctrines"

Does that miss the point? Why did Christianity fall so easily? If it was so good?

WWI, an utter betrayal of our leadership. Wilson, the greatest American mass murderer. Nice guy, though. Witty.

The Depression. After WWI, this really showed that American leadership was BAD. That something was WRONG.

WWII. Utter hellfire and damnation. The rise of a new generation of leaders...who were no smarter than the last. Clueless brainless boobs, all. THEY DID NOT KEEP THE US OUT OF THE WAR.

So, after all that, of course that generation gave up. It was no use. NOTHING WORKED. So, just keep to yourself, and raise your familys, in this failed, failed state. This meets exactly, the Greek definition of "idiot".

Of course it fell over. Rotten to the core.

I think, the real turning point, was the reaction to the depression. The cause was obvious, and there were many useful things to try. We could have instituted a minimum national income, given each American a share, in businees of the nation as whole, some kind of ownership, and representation, in the corporate halls of power.

We could have insured, that the profits of all corporations, benefit the society as a whole (as Europe has done) instead of those at the very top. We could have shortened the workweek to thirty two hours.

Instead, the elite, the leadership, began to run the country, for THEIR benefit, and not for the benefit of the nation as a whole. This has continued TO THIS DAY. The upper class has betrayed this country and PREYS upon it, as their KINGDOM.

That may have had something to do with it.




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50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Good summary, and I think you're right. Similar to the effects of WWI on European intellectual and cultural life.

Part of my difficult in understanding the 60s is understanding the "hollowness in the 50s" that you describe. I wasn't there. Didn't live through it. Just had to live with the consequences.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Recently re-read most of On the Road. I adored it when I was 23 and read it the first time. Now I'm 50 and well, I had a more indulgent attitude toward its now-obvious weaknesses and the Beats. They are not responsible for the hippies or the leftist crap that came after. It was about letting your freak flag fly and exploring freedom. It was cool for its time, and yes, self-indulgent and irresponsible and self-mythologizing. They got away with it, kind of. The weaknesses are forgivable ... Kerouac in particular was earnest, shy, alcoholic, and just looking for something that he never quite found.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well said, LeeJohnson. Beats such as Ginsberg and Burroughs have had especially bad influences up through today, but some Beat-ness was an understandable reaction to the sometimes stifling comformity that was present.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
There were other related things happening in the culture at that time. The "angry young men" school of British writers, Marlon Brando and James Dean, the birth of rock and roll, the publication of the scandalous novel Payton Place and the first issue of Playboy were some of them. The film The Man In The Grey Flannel Suit was the first in a spate of films about the empty materialism and spiritual hollowness of capitalism. The fifties served as the incubator for much of what the '60s brought to the surface.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
I disagree. They were the old men who taught the hippies and leftists how to be. The Boomers are their children.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Kerouac, Ginsberg, Timothy Leary - all contemporaries, born in the 1920s. Their generation is responsible for the 60s, not the Baby Boomers. The Boomers had to learn from someone.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
"The Boomers had to learn from someone."

EXACTLY. The Boomers were taught by the Beats, and then *enabled* by certain contemporaries of the Beats -- namely, the decidedly unhip but corruptible parents and college administrators of the 1960s, who, I suspect, secretly *liked* the ideas of "free love", "if it feels good, do it", and "free to be me" -- and all the other self-indulgent concepts of the counter-culture -- and decided they wanted a piece of that action, too.

It takes more than just a single generation to wreck a civilization.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
The Beats were marginalized until the '60s when they were dragged out from under a bed and put on display like a syphilitic prostitute, already old and alcohol and drug-addled.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Sanger, Kinsey, Marcuse and other great frauds helped plant the seeds of the Sexual Revolution well back into the 20th Century. And they had predecessors who were just as bad, going back to Biblical times.

I still mostly blame the Baby Boomers, though, for entrenching the Sexual Revolution and Political Correctness, and for being so self-indulgent and ignorant of history.

If the 60's hadn't gone way beyond just encouraging non-comformity, then it would have been OK. But what happened in years such as 1968 and afterwards destroyed our civilization. And many Boomers still don't get it.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
Generation Hustle. A few decades worth of fringe hustlers, up to about the time of the Lou Reed recently honored at PJM, were blessed with an endless stream of marks in the form of the Boomers. And so, here we are.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
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